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caulfield12

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Everything posted by caulfield12

  1. caulfield12

    COVID-19/Coronavirus thread

    Anyone has any questions...I’m stuck about five kilometers from the epicenter. Public transportation out of city shut down, and food quickly flying off the shelves of grocery stores. Can’t go out in public without a mask. Chinese air force will bombard city with bleach tonight between 5-9 p.m. Chinese New Year travel plans all cancelled...heck, the WHO is probably going to declare an emergency today, which means most countries will lock down flights in and out of China.
  2. caulfield12

    Managerial Candidates List

    You’d have to think either Espada or Quatraro...
  3. caulfield12

    Managerial Candidates List

    Helped make a series of terrible DBacks trades with Dave Stewart...somehow they survived for 2-3 years, and didn't completely bottom out, but some of those trades look even worse now in retrospect.
  4. caulfield12

    COVID-19/Coronavirus thread

    Guess Barron Trump had at least one positive COVID test but asymptomatic...another name to add to the list.
  5. caulfield12

    Sox Press Conference - 11am 10/12 - RR out as Sox manager

    https://www.yahoo.com/sports/firing-rick-renteria-brutal-necessary-203421114.html
  6. caulfield12

    NLDS- Dodgers vs Padres

    Well, we have a number of Sox posters who like to go all the way back to Babe Ruth, 1919, Charles Comiskey, Shoeless Joe Jackson and Kennesaw Mountain Landis in their “Sox franchise is jinxed” rabbit holes. Let’s just say neither franchise has exactly distinguished itself in Yankees, Red Sox, Cardinals or Braves fashion over both long and (relatively) short histories.
  7. caulfield12

    COVID-19/Coronavirus thread

    https://finance.yahoo.com/news/less-educated-asian-americans-among-hardest-hit-job-losses-during-pandemic-182941175.html Mitch McConnell bringing up this as option for "blue states" is one of many reasons the bankruptcy fallacy is out there in the first place, btw. Now the argument pretty much centers on an individual city, like Chicago, filing for bankruptcy...where you have lots of arguments on both sides of the ledger, obviously. Why can’t states use the federal bankruptcy system to reorganize their debt? “There are two reasons why state governments currently cannot use the federal bankruptcy system to reorganize their debt. First, the federal bankruptcy code does not allow—and has never allowed—state governments to declare bankruptcy. Since 1937, the bankruptcy code has allowed ‘municipalities’ to declare bankruptcy. The term ‘municipality’ is defined in the bankruptcy code as a ‘political subdivision or public agency or instrumentality of a state.’ This definition is broad enough to include cities, counties, townships, school districts and public improvement districts. It also includes revenue-producing bodies that provide services which are paid for by users rather than by general taxes, such as bridge authorities, highway authorities and gas authorities. But it does not include state governments. “The second reason stems from the U.S. Constitution. The contracts clause of the U.S. Constitution prohibits state governments from ‘impairing the obligation of contracts.’ As originally understood and enforced, this clause prohibited state legislatures from passing any laws to relieve either private debt or the state government's own debt. Beginning in 1934, however, the Supreme Court began to interpret the contracts clause more flexibly and not as an absolute bar to state debt relief laws. Even under the flexible modern approach, however, the Supreme Court in 1977 reiterated that ‘a state cannot refuse to meet its legitimate financial obligations simply because it would prefer to spend the money (on something else.)’ Thus, were Congress to amend the federal bankruptcy code to authorize states to repudiate debt, the Supreme Court would then need to decide the novel constitutional question of whether such debt repudiation would nonetheless violate the contracts clause of Article I, Section 10.” https://www.csg.org/pubs/capitolideas/enews/issue65_3.aspx
  8. caulfield12

    Offseason Targets

    Too much bad blood remaining from the LaRoche/Drake/Sale fiasco...don't see it happening.
  9. caulfield12

    Offseason Targets

    Underpaying LeMahieu and Gausman by quite a bit...
  10. caulfield12

    NLDS- Dodgers vs Padres

    LOL. I'm okay. This wasn't the year, not with all the pitching injuries down the stretch. Tatis, Jr., met his limitations. That Bellinger catch turned the series permanently in favor of the Dodgers (finalized when they failed to come back in the 9th against Jansen/Kelly.) Tonight, he had another opportunity up 2-1 with the bases loaded and two outs against Urias, struck out, and then the Dodgers exploded the next inning. Those were the two massive momentum shifts in this series. Feels like he started to press, because he also made some uncharacteristic defensive mistakes in both series. That strikeout led to an error the following inning that helped to open the floodgates. Let's not forget our own history trading Sirotka, who hardly was the same pitcher for Toronto (and led to the Keith Law lifetime "grudge")...of course, David Wells and Frank Thomas famously didn't get along either, and Thomas missed almost that entire 2001 season as both teams suffered bad karma. Sirotka, it turned out, had a damaged shoulder, and never pitched again in the majors. The Jays tried to get Bud Selig to undo the trade or make the White Sox give them another player, but Bud ruled for the White Sox. I thought that teams did physicals on players they are thinking of picking up in trade, I don’t know if the Jays did this time. It wasn’t like Wells was great for the Sox, he only made 16 starts the next year, going 5-7 with a 4.47 ERA. After that season, he signed with the Yankees as a free agent. It wasn’t an excellent trade for either team, but the Jays had to pay Sirotka $6.8 million over the next years, which was $2.45 million less than what Wells got in 2001 from the White Sox. So even though it isn’t exactly something that wouldn’t be at the top of Gord Ash’s resume, it saved us some money. Sirotka would never pitch in the majors again. sbnation.com
  11. caulfield12

    ALDS- A's vs Astros

    File this with the no Crochet injury, no Eloy injury and Renteria manages the bullpen as skillfully as Jayce Tingler against the Cardinals category. I had a feeling the Astros were going to be a really, really tough out once they got rolling. Imagine if they take the Yankees and Dodgers again?
  12. caulfield12

    NLDS- Dodgers vs Padres

    Fine, you have two of the best offenses in baseball. For the White Sox, it’s all about starting pitching. For the Padres, it’s Gore’s readiness, health and finding one more starter from Morejon, Patino and Baez. Will lose Richards, Profar and Rosenthal to FA, although Yates will return and they’d love to keep Profar as well. Might look to deal Myers, Mejia and spare pitching depth.
  13. caulfield12

    NLDS- Dodgers vs Padres

    Goes back to a game-winning homer Machado hit against LA in the regular season.
  14. caulfield12

    NLDS- Dodgers vs Padres

    Even if Bellinger doesn’t rob that homer, SD doesn’t have the starting pitching to stay in this. They’ll have to go to Paddack for Game 3, and he just hasn’t been the same dominating presence he was as a rookie. No matter what options Tingler had/has to choose from, none of them are close to ideal
  15. caulfield12

    NLDS- Dodgers vs Padres

    Dodgers have the better team, but it’s getting closer. Just can’t go through a bullpen game after game after game. With a healthy Lamet, Clevinger and the addition of Gore, you’ve got a real series. Even White Sox fans wouldn’t be very excited about adding Kyle Davies to the back end of the rotation.
  16. caulfield12

    ALDS- A's vs Astros

    A’s have to somehow survive tomorrow without Hendriks. Could throw Montas, Fiers or Minor.
  17. caulfield12

    COVID-19/Coronavirus thread

    This is why pretty much nobody wants to be a public school teacher today. Impossible decisions. The feeling that you’re there 50-75% as a babysitter and social worker in most underperforming public school districts. It’s policy failure after policy failure. Entitled kids at better schools with overbearing parents. Technology/cell phone/game addictions. Paying for school supplies yourself, often from summer or part-time jobs. Expense of master’s programs versus pay scale bumps, but expectation of advanced degrees (of course, young/cheap teachers fit budgets better now). Increasing amounts of apathy, lack of focus and disrespect. Those that do decide to teach aren’t entering as much for the calling, but out of practical concerns like health insurance, vacation time and pension (shrinking rapidly) benefits. K-6 is where one sees the most dedication and idealism, but also a ton of resulting burnout.
  18. caulfield12

    COVID-19/Coronavirus thread

    January 23rd to my wife going back to work on March 30th (essential/govnt workers)...that said, the official opening up was April 8th, and from a practical consideration, most K-7 students never went to school that entire time, in-person. Only Grade 6/9/12 for nation-wide exams in June and July. We got an emergency permission to bring kids back in mid-May for one week (mock exams). I didn’t go outside once from January 23rd until May 25th, a full four months. For the majority of people in the city, including senior citizens/retired, the average was somewhere around 3 1/2 - 4 months inside entirely...only being allowed to pick up food at the apartment gate or go out once a week for groceries, and you had to go through numerous checkpoints with temp checks to get anywhere. If you had a fever or even got caught trying to buy fever medicines from the pharmacy, immediate two week quarantines away from family. Lots of families even refused to let supposedly healthy family members members return after quarantine if there was a baby or young child in the household. Keep in mind, many apartments had three generations if not four staying together, so both very old and very young mixed together with twenty and thirty-some parents.
  19. caulfield12

    COVID-19/Coronavirus thread

    Probably something to do with the fact that 30-50% of senior citizens are scared to wait in long, out in the open, public lines with some refusing to wear masks or quite confrontational about being forced to...can guarantee he will push mail in ballots in Florida as well as a number of higher risk states with disproportionate voting numbers over age 50.
  20. caulfield12

    COVID-19/Coronavirus thread

    https://finance.yahoo.com/news/thats-the-only-way-we-survived-government-stimulus-provided-millions-a-lifeline-now-families-are-on-the-brink-142544221.html
  21. caulfield12

    ALDS- Rays vs Yankees

    Bucknor I think it is...not to be confused with Bill’s 1986 Mookie Wilson/Cubbie/Seinfeld version.
  22. caulfield12

    COVID-19/Coronavirus thread

    The difference is on the strength of the expected government response that’s coming in late January or early February assuming current election trend lines continue to put a stop to this in the heart of the winter before we lose another semester of school to online classes. At a certain point, enough people not being responsible and a critical mass not enforcing policies (that are wildly inconsistent and constantly changing already) leads us to the conclusion something more draconian must be imposed. Texsox is trying to humanize it like good politician with vignettes and stories of individual entrepreneurs, but they’re all going to be swept away if this goes on for another 4-6 months and without any more government financial assistance. For example, the US rental market is on the verge of a complete collapse as the pressure on landlords builds with no end in sight. https://www.cnn.com/2020/10/07/tech/qanon-europe-cult-intl/index.html It’s going to get REALLY ugly/nasty/Darwinist if the entire world needs to be locked down again. There’s the exponential growth of qAnon across Europe and even South America. One of my coworkers in China has been mesmerized by this way of thinking, and he now wants to physically fight another Civil War back in the US with anyone who doesn’t agree with his conspiracy-driven philosophy. Texsox is unlikely to be a QAnon cult leader (they are wholeheartedly anti-golf as an elitist sport, except Trump and Abe playing, lol), but the scariest thing is those blindly following because there’s such a vacuum in world leadership that they are gravitating to like-minded communities for a sense of solidarity, for a meaning/purpose in life.
  23. caulfield12

    COVID-19/Coronavirus thread

    I also think a lot of this falls under the countryside/rural/open spaces vs. city/urban area argument... While there are exceptions, many or most of the Red states tend to have less dense populations. While there are notable higher population states (like Ohio, Texas, Florida and Georgia,) there’s that constant narrative barrage of “failed city/Blue mayors” arguments being made each and every day on conservative social media...that the country is completely falling apart due to mayors and not governors or the executive branch. If you were to throw out a few stereotypes, the red states supposedly care more about individual freedoms, gun rights, less interventionist or limited government, etc. Going by most of the comments here, people in urban areas are more willing to collectively shut down. And throughout this, those in rural areas believe (mostly) that life should still go on as normally as possible, with many saying things like “I’d rather die as a result of the virus than wear a mask for the 3-5 years or completely change the way I live my life because someone TELLS me that it’s the right or best or safest thing to do and is for the collective good of everyone else.” And the logical counterargument is places like Florida or South Dakota that are basically now taking the Sweden path moving forward...when, at best, only 10-20% of the US has been exposed/infected already and it’s burning through the most secure building in the world like a California wildfire. I would guess we’ll see similar trend lines between city/urban and country/rural about acceptance of the “compelling community need” to be vaccinated, once these first human participants have cleared at least three months after Stage 3 trials without any significant side effects.
  24. caulfield12

    COVID-19/Coronavirus thread

    He even said it was exactly five times worse, quite precisely.
  25. caulfield12

    COVID-19/Coronavirus thread

    The problem with all these analogies to motor safety laws is there’s a huge consequence for not following them...losing your license, going to jail, etc. We don’t have that level of seriousness yet...not across the board. It’s more analogous to the pregnant mother who smokes, drinks alcohol, especially any illegal drugs while pregnant...it’s more of a social stigma, and every mother knows it can lead to birth defects...but that doesn’t stop some from taking that risk. Back to that personal responsibility, where there’s not as much of an official government enforcement mechanism, other than the consequences to the health of an unborn baby (outside of the illegal drugs angle.) You can’t have a true lockdown in most American cities (anyway) because almost everyone has a car, and most live in single family homes, so there’s simply no way like here in China to block them in their houses, garages or driveways that’s going to be practical. There aren’t enough police, National Guard or active duty military to control massive swaths of population or land area, either. Can hardly control travel from one state to another, unless all available resources were allocated to that purpose. Plus, there’s neither the will, funding nor available (in the moment) training for efficient contact tracing...which has been one of many failures on all levels of government.
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