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This--and other threads from anti-rebuild folks who are furious that a rebuilding team is bad--have really convinced me and gotten me thinking.  I have even tried to apply the lessons of these threads to my own life.  For example, in the offseason I decided to remodel my kitchen.  I did this because it was old and bad, and I wanted one that was new and good.  My contractor told me that I'd be "without a kitchen" for two months while they finished the job.  I paid him, but must say I was really taken aback when I walked into my kitchen in early April to find all the appliances and most of the walls were gone!

My original attitude about this was, "well, I will suffer through the pain of remodeling for the delayed gratification of a nicer kitchen down the road.  After all, this was the plan all along."  But reading the comments in these threads has inspired me to treat each day without a working kitchen as a new and independent outrage.  I walk around the site each day screaming "where is the refrigerator?!!" and "This kitchen doesn't even have running water - kitchens should have running water!!"  I mean, the name of the game is to have a kitchen, not a construction site, right?  Pretty simple.

My contractor tries to calm me down by saying  things like "....I don't understand -- IT IS a construction site, because it's under construction"  and "the refrigerator will arrive when the kitchen is done -- remember?" and "We talked about all this, didn't we?  Wait, am I going crazy?"  But honestly I think he's just an apologist.  I'm thinking of firing him and having my big Viking stove delivered and plopped right in the middle of my former kitchen so I can admire it all day amid the sawdust.  It's really the least that I deserve.

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1 minute ago, 35thstreetswarm said:

This--and other threads from anti-rebuild folks who are furious that a rebuilding team is bad--have really convinced me and gotten me thinking.  I have even tried to apply the lessons of these threads to my own life.  For example, in the offseason I decided to remodel my kitchen.  I did this because it was old and bad, and I wanted one that was new and good.  My contractor told me that I'd be "without a kitchen" for two months while they finished the job.  I paid him, but must say I was really taken aback when I walked into my kitchen in early April to find all the appliances and most of the walls were gone!

My original attitude about this was, "well, I will suffer through the pain of remodeling for the delayed gratification of a nicer kitchen down the road.  After all, this was the plan all along."  But reading the comments in these threads has inspired me to treat each day without a working kitchen as a new and independent outrage.  I walk around the site each day screaming "where is the refrigerator?!!" and "This kitchen doesn't even have running water - kitchens should have running water!!"  I mean, the name of the game is to have a kitchen, not a construction site, right?  Pretty simple.

My contractor tries to calm me down by saying  things like "....I don't understand -- IT IS a construction site, because it's under construction"  and "the refrigerator will arrive when the kitchen is done -- remember?" and "We talked about all this, didn't we?  Wait, am I going crazy?"  But honestly I think he's just an apologist.  I'm thinking of firing him and having my big Viking stove delivered and plopped right in the middle of my former kitchen so I can admire it all day amid the sawdust.  It's really the least that I deserve.

I love you.

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2 minutes ago, 35thstreetswarm said:

This--and other threads from anti-rebuild folks who are furious that a rebuilding team is bad--have really convinced me and gotten me thinking.  I have even tried to apply the lessons of these threads to my own life.  For example, in the offseason I decided to remodel my kitchen.  I did this because it was old and bad, and I wanted one that was new and good.  My contractor told me that I'd be "without a kitchen" for two months while they finished the job.  I paid him, but must say I was really taken aback when I walked into my kitchen in early April to find all the appliances and most of the walls were gone!

My original attitude about this was, "well, I will suffer through the pain of remodeling for the delayed gratification of a nicer kitchen down the road.  After all, this was the plan all along."  But reading the comments in these threads has inspired me to treat each day without a working kitchen as a new and independent outrage.  I walk around the site each day screaming "where is the refrigerator?!!" and "This kitchen doesn't even have running water - kitchens should have running water!!"  I mean, the name of the game is to have a kitchen, not a construction site, right?  Pretty simple.

My contractor tries to calm me down by saying  things like "....I don't understand -- IT IS a construction site, because it's under construction"  and "the refrigerator will arrive when the kitchen is done -- remember?" and "We talked about all this, didn't we?  Wait, am I going crazy?"  But honestly I think he's just an apologist.  I'm thinking of firing him and having my big Viking stove delivered and plopped right in the middle of my former kitchen so I can admire it all day amid the sawdust.  It's really the least that I deserve.

POTY

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3 minutes ago, 35thstreetswarm said:

This--and other threads from anti-rebuild folks who are furious that a rebuilding team is bad--have really convinced me and gotten me thinking.  I have even tried to apply the lessons of these threads to my own life.  For example, in the offseason I decided to remodel my kitchen.  I did this because it was old and bad, and I wanted one that was new and good.  My contractor told me that I'd be "without a kitchen" for two months while they finished the job.  I paid him, but must say I was really taken aback when I walked into my kitchen in early April to find all the appliances and most of the walls were gone!

My original attitude about this was, "well, I will suffer through the pain of remodeling for the delayed gratification of a nicer kitchen down the road.  After all, this was the plan all along."  But reading the comments in these threads has inspired me to treat each day without a working kitchen as a new and independent outrage.  I walk around the site each day screaming "where is the refrigerator?!!" and "This kitchen doesn't even have running water - kitchens should have running water!!"  I mean, the name of the game is to have a kitchen, not a construction site, right?  Pretty simple.

My contractor tries to calm me down by saying  things like "....I don't understand -- IT IS a construction site, because it's under construction"  and "the refrigerator will arrive when the kitchen is done -- remember?" and "We talked about all this, didn't we?  Wait, am I going crazy?"  But honestly I think he's just an apologist.  I'm thinking of firing him and having my big Viking stove delivered and plopped right in the middle of my former kitchen so I can admire it all day amid the sawdust.  It's really the least that I deserve.

This is fantastic.....and I am actually remodeling one of my bathrooms right now so it is a very applicable example for me!  This is especially poignant because of the way the Sox are going after this...well said 35thstreetswarm.  Well said.

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11 minutes ago, 35thstreetswarm said:

This--and other threads from anti-rebuild folks who are furious that a rebuilding team is bad--have really convinced me and gotten me thinking.  I have even tried to apply the lessons of these threads to my own life.  For example, in the offseason I decided to remodel my kitchen.  I did this because it was old and bad, and I wanted one that was new and good.  My contractor told me that I'd be "without a kitchen" for two months while they finished the job.  I paid him, but must say I was really taken aback when I walked into my kitchen in early April to find all the appliances and most of the walls were gone!

My original attitude about this was, "well, I will suffer through the pain of remodeling for the delayed gratification of a nicer kitchen down the road.  After all, this was the plan all along."  But reading the comments in these threads has inspired me to treat each day without a working kitchen as a new and independent outrage.  I walk around the site each day screaming "where is the refrigerator?!!" and "This kitchen doesn't even have running water - kitchens should have running water!!"  I mean, the name of the game is to have a kitchen, not a construction site, right?  Pretty simple.

My contractor tries to calm me down by saying  things like "....I don't understand -- IT IS a construction site, because it's under construction"  and "the refrigerator will arrive when the kitchen is done -- remember?" and "We talked about all this, didn't we?  Wait, am I going crazy?"  But honestly I think he's just an apologist.  I'm thinking of firing him and having my big Viking stove delivered and plopped right in the middle of my former kitchen so I can admire it all day amid the sawdust.  It's really the least that I deserve.

The difference is that if you hired a good contractor, you are guaranteed to have a very nice kitchen when he is done. The contractors for the sox don't have good track records and the is no guarantee the Sox will be good at the end of the remodel. Eventually you will have a great environment for that viking stove. It's not that clear for the sox.

not that i don't agree with the rebuild, they had to try something different. however, I can understand why some people don't like the current situation.

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2 minutes ago, ptatc said:

The difference is that if you hired a good contractor, you are guaranteed to have a very nice kitchen when he is done. The contractors for the sox don't have good track records and the is no guarantee the Sox will be good at the end of the remodel. Eventually you will have a great environment for that viking stove. It's not that clear for the sox.

not that i don't agree with the rebuild, they had to try something different. however, I can understand why some people don't like the current situation.

 

I wouldnt have a day job if people always did good work :D

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1 hour ago, greg775 said:

Why are so many people comfortable in telling greg what to do?  I never said that.

You said

1 hour ago, greg775 said:

Then I hope he stays in the minors til a start or two in September.

In response to

1 hour ago, Jose Abreu said:

Kopech isn't gonna be an ace right away. He's gonna struggle this year in the majors.

Which implies that your opinion is that if Kopech doesn't immediately perform at ace level, he should stay in the minors.

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29 minutes ago, 35thstreetswarm said:

This--and other threads from anti-rebuild folks who are furious that a rebuilding team is bad--have really convinced me and gotten me thinking.  I have even tried to apply the lessons of these threads to my own life.  For example, in the offseason I decided to remodel my kitchen.  I did this because it was old and bad, and I wanted one that was new and good.  My contractor told me that I'd be "without a kitchen" for two months while they finished the job.  I paid him, but must say I was really taken aback when I walked into my kitchen in early April to find all the appliances and most of the walls were gone!

My original attitude about this was, "well, I will suffer through the pain of remodeling for the delayed gratification of a nicer kitchen down the road.  After all, this was the plan all along."  But reading the comments in these threads has inspired me to treat each day without a working kitchen as a new and independent outrage.  I walk around the site each day screaming "where is the refrigerator?!!" and "This kitchen doesn't even have running water - kitchens should have running water!!"  I mean, the name of the game is to have a kitchen, not a construction site, right?  Pretty simple.

My contractor tries to calm me down by saying  things like "....I don't understand -- IT IS a construction site, because it's under construction"  and "the refrigerator will arrive when the kitchen is done -- remember?" and "We talked about all this, didn't we?  Wait, am I going crazy?"  But honestly I think he's just an apologist.  I'm thinking of firing him and having my big Viking stove delivered and plopped right in the middle of my former kitchen so I can admire it all day amid the sawdust.  It's really the least that I deserve.

Yeah great post except there are very few anti rebuilding and furious that we are bad people here. There are a few but most of us just question the front offices' track record when it comes to putting a FINISHED product on the field when the rebuild is supposed to, ya know, actually be finished.

15 minutes ago, ptatc said:

The difference is that if you hired a good contractor, you are guaranteed to have a very nice kitchen when he is done. The contractors for the sox don't have good track records and the is no guarantee the Sox will be good at the end of the remodel. Eventually you will have a great environment for that viking stove. It's not that clear for the sox.

not that i don't agree with the rebuild, they had to try something different. however, I can understand why some people don't like the current situation.

Exactly

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3 minutes ago, Tony said:

Waddle and Silvy talking Eloy-Q trade now, did the Cubs make a mistake. 

This is not an unfair question, they paid a fair price for Quintana but he hasn't lived up to what he did with the White Sox. How lucky were we getting with these guys - Quintana and Eaton - when we had them?

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Just now, Balta1701 said:

This is not an unfair question, they paid a fair price for Quintana but he hasn't lived up to what he did with the White Sox. How lucky were we getting with these guys - Quintana and Eaton - when we had them?

Actually got Eloy at just the right time when he was hitting . 271 in the Cubs system . He's been about .350 since then if you combine all his stats with A+ , AA and the Dominican league since then.

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4 minutes ago, Balta1701 said:

This is not an unfair question, they paid a fair price for Quintana but he hasn't lived up to what he did with the White Sox. How lucky were we getting with these guys - Quintana and Eaton - when we had them?

Well in both cases it was the percentage play.  Q because he's a pitcher (and like any pitcher subject to more variance) and Eaton because he was coming off a 6 fWAR season in which he managed to relatively healthy.  He was both an injury concern and a regression concern and was traded at peak value.

Some luck was involved but it was also just the percentage play.

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31 minutes ago, ptatc said:

The difference is that if you hired a good contractor, you are guaranteed to have a very nice kitchen when he is done. The contractors for the sox don't have good track records and the is no guarantee the Sox will be good at the end of the remodel. Eventually you will have a great environment for that viking stove. It's not that clear for the sox.

not that i don't agree with the rebuild, they had to try something different. however, I can understand why some people don't like the current situation.

While that is certainly a difference between the situation and the analogy, I don't think it's related at all to the point he's making. 

I don't think anyone in this thread is saying "we should rush Eloy/Kopech because the rebuild might end up failing anyway." They're saying "we should rush Eloy/Kopech because this is rebuild is excruciating."

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30 minutes ago, Soxbadger said:

 

I wouldnt have a day job if people always did good work :D

Hence the "if"  

Maybe if the rebuild doesnt work, we can hire you go go after the Sox FO.

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2 minutes ago, Eminor3rd said:

While that is certainly a difference between the situation and the analogy, I don't think it's related at all to the point he's making. 

I don't think anyone in this thread is saying "we should rush Eloy/Kopech because the rebuild might end up failing anyway." They're saying "we should rush Eloy/Kopech because this is rebuild is excruciating."

I know is was really more of a joke albeit a bad one. On break from school and my mind is too idle.

Edited by ptatc

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5 minutes ago, chitownsportsfan said:

Well in both cases it was the percentage play.  Q because he's a pitcher (and like any pitcher subject to more variance) and Eaton because he was coming off a 6 fWAR season in which he managed to relatively healthy.  He was both an injury concern and a regression concern and was traded at peak value.

Some luck was involved but it was also just the percentage play.

I think we should remember these guys the next time someone says "and we could have been a playoff team if only we'd have gotten lucky".

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1 hour ago, 35thstreetswarm said:

This--and other threads from anti-rebuild folks who are furious that a rebuilding team is bad--have really convinced me and gotten me thinking.  I have even tried to apply the lessons of these threads to my own life.  For example, in the offseason I decided to remodel my kitchen.  I did this because it was old and bad, and I wanted one that was new and good.  My contractor told me that I'd be "without a kitchen" for two months while they finished the job.  I paid him, but must say I was really taken aback when I walked into my kitchen in early April to find all the appliances and most of the walls were gone!

 My original attitude about this was, "well, I will suffer through the pain of remodeling for the delayed gratification of a nicer kitchen down the road.  After all, this was the plan all along."  But reading the comments in these threads has inspired me to treat each day without a working kitchen as a new and independent outrage.  I walk around the site each day screaming "where is the refrigerator?!!" and "This kitchen doesn't even have running water - kitchens should have running water!!"  I mean, the name of the game is to have a kitchen, not a construction site, right?  Pretty simple.

My contractor tries to calm me down by saying  things like "....I don't understand -- IT IS a construction site, because it's under construction"  and "the refrigerator will arrive when the kitchen is done -- remember?" and "We talked about all this, didn't we?  Wait, am I going crazy?"  But honestly I think he's just an apologist.  I'm thinking of firing him and having my big Viking stove delivered and plopped right in the middle of my former kitchen so I can admire it all day amid the sawdust.  It's really the least that I deserve.

We all bow down to @35thstreetswarm today.

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11 minutes ago, ptatc said:

Hence the "if"  

Maybe if the rebuild doesnt work, we can hire you go go after the Sox FO.

Consumer fraud act!

 

They promised me a good team and all I got was a 75 wins. 

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50 minutes ago, ptatc said:

The difference is that if you hired a good contractor, you are guaranteed to have a very nice kitchen when he is done. The contractors for the sox don't have good track records and the is no guarantee the Sox will be good at the end of the remodel. Eventually you will have a great environment for that viking stove. It's not that clear for the sox.

not that i don't agree with the rebuild, they had to try something different. however, I can understand why some people don't like the current situation.

The point is that there's no reason to bring the stove into a mess of a kitchen. Having the stove there doesn't help the kitchen get done quicker. 

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1 hour ago, 35thstreetswarm said:

This--and other threads from anti-rebuild folks who are furious that a rebuilding team is bad--have really convinced me and gotten me thinking.  I have even tried to apply the lessons of these threads to my own life.  For example, in the offseason I decided to remodel my kitchen.  I did this because it was old and bad, and I wanted one that was new and good.  My contractor told me that I'd be "without a kitchen" for two months while they finished the job.  I paid him, but must say I was really taken aback when I walked into my kitchen in early April to find all the appliances and most of the walls were gone!

My original attitude about this was, "well, I will suffer through the pain of remodeling for the delayed gratification of a nicer kitchen down the road.  After all, this was the plan all along."  But reading the comments in these threads has inspired me to treat each day without a working kitchen as a new and independent outrage.  I walk around the site each day screaming "where is the refrigerator?!!" and "This kitchen doesn't even have running water - kitchens should have running water!!"  I mean, the name of the game is to have a kitchen, not a construction site, right?  Pretty simple.

My contractor tries to calm me down by saying  things like "....I don't understand -- IT IS a construction site, because it's under construction"  and "the refrigerator will arrive when the kitchen is done -- remember?" and "We talked about all this, didn't we?  Wait, am I going crazy?"  But honestly I think he's just an apologist.  I'm thinking of firing him and having my big Viking stove delivered and plopped right in the middle of my former kitchen so I can admire it all day amid the sawdust.  It's really the least that I deserve.

To be fair, a true comparison would be you waiting 4 years for the kitchen to be complete, not two months. In the mean time, you will get to use small bits as time progresses.

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31 minutes ago, Tony said:

Waddle and Silvy talking Eloy-Q trade now, did the Cubs make a mistake. 

Eloy alone is probably going to win this deal for the White Sox, if he hits anywhere near what he is flashing right now.

If Dylan Cease can stay healthy and become a starter of a level somewhere even close to his ceiling, the Sox get a huge win in this deal as Cease would be worth Q alone, Jimenez would be a bonus.

If the Sox get a star Jimenez, a middle rotation Cease, and anything out of Rose and or Flete, again this is a huge win for the Sox.

If the Sox get a star Jimenez, a front line Cease, and anything out of Rose and Flete, this is one of the greatest trades of all time for the White Sox.

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1 hour ago, 35thstreetswarm said:

This--and other threads from anti-rebuild folks who are furious that a rebuilding team is bad--have really convinced me and gotten me thinking.  I have even tried to apply the lessons of these threads to my own life.  For example, in the offseason I decided to remodel my kitchen.  I did this because it was old and bad, and I wanted one that was new and good.  My contractor told me that I'd be "without a kitchen" for two months while they finished the job.  I paid him, but must say I was really taken aback when I walked into my kitchen in early April to find all the appliances and most of the walls were gone!

My original attitude about this was, "well, I will suffer through the pain of remodeling for the delayed gratification of a nicer kitchen down the road.  After all, this was the plan all along."  But reading the comments in these threads has inspired me to treat each day without a working kitchen as a new and independent outrage.  I walk around the site each day screaming "where is the refrigerator?!!" and "This kitchen doesn't even have running water - kitchens should have running water!!"  I mean, the name of the game is to have a kitchen, not a construction site, right?  Pretty simple.

My contractor tries to calm me down by saying  things like "....I don't understand -- IT IS a construction site, because it's under construction"  and "the refrigerator will arrive when the kitchen is done -- remember?" and "We talked about all this, didn't we?  Wait, am I going crazy?"  But honestly I think he's just an apologist.  I'm thinking of firing him and having my big Viking stove delivered and plopped right in the middle of my former kitchen so I can admire it all day amid the sawdust.  It's really the least that I deserve.

I crown thee, King of Soxtalk.

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26 minutes ago, Eminor3rd said:

While that is certainly a difference between the situation and the analogy, I don't think it's related at all to the point he's making. 

I don't think anyone in this thread is saying "we should rush Eloy/Kopech because the rebuild might end up failing anyway." They're saying "we should rush Eloy/Kopech because this is rebuild is excruciating."

Nope neither of those. People want them to come up this summer to gain experience, so that by 2020 our team is ready to try and get a championship. If they come up next year like some want, then 2020 will become a learning year as well. Either way, you lost a year because of bringing them up before next year, or because they are learning in the 2020 window. Another reason to bring them up soon is so free agents can get a look at our roster coming together. No one is signing with this shit show of a team right now, but if they start building momentum later this season, guys may just give us a chance if the money is right.

Edited by SonofaRoache

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1 minute ago, SonofaRoache said:

Nope neither of those. People want them to come up this summer to gain experience, so that by 2020 our team is ready to try and get a championship. If they come up next year like some want, then 2020 will become a learning year as well. Either way, you lost a year eithewr because of bringing them up before next year, or because they are learning in the 2020 window. Another reason to bring them up soon is so free agents can get a look at our roster coming together. No one is signing with this shit show of a team right now, but if they start building momentum later this season, guys may just give us a chance if the money is right.

If they aren't ready to be here, it doesn't do them any good to be here. 

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Just now, SonofaRoache said:

Nope neither of those. People want them to come up this summer to gain experience, so that by 2020 our team is ready to try and get a championship. If they come up next year like some want, then 2020 will become a learning year as well. Either way, you lost a year eithewr because of bringing them up before next year, or because they are learning in the 2020 window. Another reason to bring them up soon is so free agents can get a look at our roster coming together. No one is signing with this shit show of a team right now, but if they start building momentum later this season, guys may just give us a chance if the money is right.

Then you bring Kopech up midseason to a terrible team that can't score runs and there's a good chance he loses command trying to strike everyone out, or worse, he fucks his arm up because he's trying to throw everything 107 MPH. 

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1 hour ago, 35thstreetswarm said:

This--and other threads from anti-rebuild folks who are furious that a rebuilding team is bad--have really convinced me and gotten me thinking.  I have even tried to apply the lessons of these threads to my own life.  For example, in the offseason I decided to remodel my kitchen.  I did this because it was old and bad, and I wanted one that was new and good.  My contractor told me that I'd be "without a kitchen" for two months while they finished the job.  I paid him, but must say I was really taken aback when I walked into my kitchen in early April to find all the appliances and most of the walls were gone!

My original attitude about this was, "well, I will suffer through the pain of remodeling for the delayed gratification of a nicer kitchen down the road.  After all, this was the plan all along."  But reading the comments in these threads has inspired me to treat each day without a working kitchen as a new and independent outrage.  I walk around the site each day screaming "where is the refrigerator?!!" and "This kitchen doesn't even have running water - kitchens should have running water!!"  I mean, the name of the game is to have a kitchen, not a construction site, right?  Pretty simple.

My contractor tries to calm me down by saying  things like "....I don't understand -- IT IS a construction site, because it's under construction"  and "the refrigerator will arrive when the kitchen is done -- remember?" and "We talked about all this, didn't we?  Wait, am I going crazy?"  But honestly I think he's just an apologist.  I'm thinking of firing him and having my big Viking stove delivered and plopped right in the middle of my former kitchen so I can admire it all day amid the sawdust.  It's really the least that I deserve.

You trust the remodelers.  We don’t

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