Jump to content
iamshack

Technology catch-all thread

Recommended Posts

QUOTE (Y2HH @ Jun 27, 2014 -> 01:12 PM)
I said they were part of the issue, but Google wasn't much better themselves. Google has always been pretty notoriously terrible at UI design.

 

Google WAS poor at UI design. That hasn't been the case for like the last 2-3 years.

 

Android used to look like absolute crap. There was a time when HTC Sense looked infinitely better than the stock Android skin. Then Matias Duarte came from Palm and re-designed the entire OS with 4.0. It wasn't perfect, but it was a huge improvement that rivaled iOS. I'd say that until iOS 7 came out, iOS looked outdated compared to Android 4.0+ with its skeuomorphic design since it came out in 2007 and didn't really change much until iOS 7 (6 years later). Design changes a lot in half a decade. I bet a lot of people thought Windows Vista looked nice when it came out in 07 after starring at the crayon drawing that was Windows XP. Not only did iOS get boring to look at, the design itself was old.

 

Google does have issues centralizing its products and UI inconsistency does stem from that. However, pretty much every updated Google app followed the Holo design guidelines and put some small spins on it. After all, would you really want every app to look exactly the same? That'd be extremely boring. There was a lot of back and forth with where they should place the settings. Hamburger menu? Overflow button? I think they've finally moved over to putting settings in the hamburger menu, but now with Material design, I'm not sure what they're going to do. Google changes their mind a bit too much about UI design, but then again all you have to do is look at iOS and see what happens when you resist change for 5 years.

 

The main issue with Android UI isn't that Google's design sucks, it's that app developers and OEMs s*** all over it by not following them. Apple will reject your app if it looks like you put it together in 5 minutes. Google doesn't care. I guess that's the problem with having a more or less open app store, but I'd rather keep it open than have Google reign supreme and watch over everything. The apps cobbled together in 5 minutes won't be downloaded and they won't be relevant. The bigger issue is that bigger developers like Twitter and Facebook don't care to follow the design guidelines. It took Facebook 3 years to put together an app that even resembled Holo design and I get a strong feeling that was because iOS 7 went with the flatter look. Should Google force these devs to follow their guidelines? Maybe they should or maybe they already do and it falls on deaf ears. Either way, I feel like Google's done a good job with design over the past 2-3 years, but since they're not enforcers of it (like Apple probably is), devs just don't bother to follow the guidelines.

Edited by chw42

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
QUOTE (Y2HH @ Jun 26, 2014 -> 06:57 PM)
Me either? I think Microsoft made a LOT of horrible decisions under Bamler, but purposefully trying to get people to stop using their products wasn't one of them. I believe Microsoft is in much better hands now.

 

Aside from that, Android L *finally* looks like an OS I can take seriously, and no, I couldn't take previous versions seriously, as I personally believe they had horrendous UIs (and apparently Google agreed with me hence the change).

 

I think the Holo UI, but it now looks well over 2 years old. It was time for a change and I was very hopeful that they would do a UI-focused update like they did. Apple has proven that design isn't some silly thing for the non-techie.

 

QUOTE (RockRaines @ Jun 27, 2014 -> 09:11 AM)
Their largest pieces of software used by most people is office, they are trying to take that to their hosted service instead of actually selling it on the desktop. They are selling more dumb computers or tablets which eliminates the full windows license. They are trying to get people away from on prem Active Directory by moving them to Azure. Essentially trying to have everyone use their service which directly competes with what Google does.

 

I think the subscription model is a good move, if that's what you're talking about. Takes away the sticker shock - does anyone want to pay at least $120 for an office suite, outside of the people who would also be willing to pay much more? Right now, the $6.99/mo. personal subscription is worth it for the 1TB OneDrive storage alone - you couldn't get 1TB cheaper anywhere else. They're trying to maintain their market dominance of office programs by offering something (holy hell a lot of storage) that would lure people in regardless of whether they're sold on needing the Office suite.

 

You probably know more about OnPrem vs Azure, but it seems like it's going to be making less and less sense for people to manage their own data centers. Whether Azure can out-Google Google is another thing, but if nobody is going to want OnPrem they may as well prepare. Much like how Google is trying to do office, even though they aren't nearly as good at it as MS.

 

What I like about the direction of Windows is that they are going to be prepared for a world in which many fewer people are interested in a desktop or even laptop. They've now been building both software and hardware for hybrid-ish devices for a couple years and there's still not anybody doing this in earnest. Meanwhile, the Internet is being accessed more by mobile devices than laptops/desktops and that trend has not yet begun to slow down. If people are going to abandon the traditional "pretty big device with a hinge" or "computer on a desk" style of computing, MS is pretty far ahead of anyone else at offering an OS or form factor that might satisfy the needs of both portability/touch/small screen and hardware power/useful software/serious productivity.

 

The thing the market hasn't yet decided is where they stand on phones/tablets/laptops. The phones are getting larger, the tablets are getting smaller, the laptops are getting smaller, the desktop screens are getting larger. Will we be wanting big-ish (9 to 11 inch) tablet/PC hybrids for everyday browsing and today-sized phones (5 inch)? Tablet-sized phones (6 to 8 inch) and laptops (13 to 15 inch)? Big phones and desktops? I doubt the mass market will continue wanting to purchase three different things, at least with any frequency. Right now, I think people are buying computers infrequently and phones/tablets frequently. We'll see if that's what people continue to do as their laptops age.

 

QUOTE (Y2HH @ Jun 27, 2014 -> 12:26 PM)
I did not particularly like later versions of Android despite being smoother/better than early versions. Android has always been lacking in uniformity and slickness, some of which was caused by 3rd parties such as Samsung or HTC re-skinning Android, and some of it was because Google was just all over the place on the design front, where programs often had settings in different locations, and it's overall feeling of lack of optimization. To be sure, there was nothing 'wrong' with later versions of Android, but to me, it was like using Windows. It worked, it did what it was supposed to do ... but it just wasn't very ... good, and if you wanted to make it good, it took a lot of customization and digging around.

 

Ten years ago I would have been all over Android because of that ability to customize it into exactly what I wanted...I used to hack and tinker with everything, and it was great because it taught me the in's and out's of a device/operating system, and at that point in my life that was important to me. Even now I get the bug once in a while, but it fades quickly, and I just want whatever I'm using to work without hassle...and after a few days of making iOS or Android look unique, it gets old and I fall back to the, "Jesus, could you please just work when I try to do X, Y or Z, instead of me having to figure stuff out?"

 

Android L, however, looks like it's approaching the uniform/optimized/fluid state I expect out of modern hardware/operating systems.

 

After being on Android for a while now, when I use an iPhone for something my first thought is CAN I do x? Then, of course, given that I have hardly used iOS 7, I find it "non-intuitive" because I'm unfamiliar. I put that in quotes because it's easy to do all of the main functions on all of these mobile OSes, it's just a matter of whether it takes you 2 seconds because you know exactly where it is or 30 seconds because you looked through everything.

 

One of my main beefs with iOS, and it continues to be with iOS 8 it looks like, is the launcher. Launchers on Android are often a way to customize the look of things (which I like to do sometimes), but it is also a way for me to set up specific workflows. I like having a search bar widget, a weather widget, and an agenda widget and just a few frequently used apps. Then on the next screen a few other things - a rotating Feedly headlines widget along with some of my news/sports apps. The rest? Out of sight in the app drawer. Notifications are probably my next highest priority - I think iOS 7 was a big improvement in this regard, but I honestly don't recall the details.

 

Speaking of Apple and notifications, the notifications menu interested in Mavericks is just awesome. I'd be hardcore committed to Windows forever if they would implement that. Until then, I'm considering going MacBook Air for my upcoming computer purchase. Also thinking about Surface Pro 3 (really).

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
QUOTE (chw42 @ Jun 27, 2014 -> 04:03 PM)
Google WAS poor at UI design. That hasn't been the case for like the last 2-3 years.

 

Android used to look like absolute crap. There was a time when HTC Sense looked infinitely better than the stock Android skin. Then Matias Duarte came from Palm and re-designed the entire OS with 4.0. It wasn't perfect, but it was a huge improvement that rivaled iOS. I'd say that until iOS 7 came out, iOS looked outdated compared to Android 4.0+ with its skeuomorphic design since it came out in 2007 and didn't really change much until iOS 7 (6 years later). Design changes a lot in half a decade. I bet a lot of people thought Windows Vista looked nice when it came out in 07 after starring at the crayon drawing that was Windows XP. Not only did iOS get boring to look at, the design itself was old.

 

Google does have issues centralizing its products and UI inconsistency does stem from that. However, pretty much every updated Google app followed the Holo design guidelines and put some small spins on it. After all, would you really want every app to look exactly the same? That'd be extremely boring. There was a lot of back and forth with where they should place the settings. Hamburger menu? Overflow button? I think they've finally moved over to putting settings in the hamburger menu, but now with Material design, I'm not sure what they're going to do. Google changes their mind a bit too much about UI design, but then again all you have to do is look at iOS and see what happens when you resist change for 5 years.

 

The main issue with Android UI isn't that Google's design sucks, it's that app developers and OEMs s*** all over it by not following them. Apple will reject your app if it looks like you put it together in 5 minutes. Google doesn't care. I guess that's the problem with having a more or less open app store, but I'd rather keep it open than have Google reign supreme and watch over everything. The apps cobbled together in 5 minutes won't be downloaded and they won't be relevant. The bigger issue is that bigger developers like Twitter and Facebook don't care to follow the design guidelines. It took Facebook 3 years to put together an app that even resembled Holo design and I get a strong feeling that was because iOS 7 went with the flatter look. Should Google force these devs to follow their guidelines? Maybe they should or maybe they already do and it falls on deaf ears. Either way, I feel like Google's done a good job with design over the past 2-3 years, but since they're not enforcers of it (like Apple probably is), devs just don't bother to follow the guidelines.

 

Not WAS, IS. And Google knows it, hence their major redesign of something that was just redesigned less than 2 years ago.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I agree that the Holo UI needs replaced, it was far superior of pre-iOS7. It was the most up-to-date UI on the market until September 2013. And I think HTC Sense 5/6 looks great, FWIW

Edited by Jake

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
QUOTE (Jake @ Jun 27, 2014 -> 08:55 PM)
While I agree that the Holo UI needs replaced, it was far superior of pre-iOS7. It was the most up-to-date UI on the market until September 2013. And I think HTC Sense 5/6 looks great, FWIW

 

Of course, people need to recognize that a lot of this is just opinion, but it's always been my opinion that something was missing from Android, it felt clunky even after it's repeated revamps and "project butters". As said, some of this stems from the over customization OEMs do with Android, but a lot of it comes from the framework Android is built upon, which is why a lot of Google's own applications on iOS were superior to their own Android counterparts. Of course, Google has done a lot of work on UI framework as of late, and it shows ... but I disagree with anyone that thinks their UI's were ever good, it's just an opinion, but I believe they were fair to poor designs, and I think the proof exists in that Google obviously agreed with me, hence their entire rework of the framework Android is based on. And it's not just limited to Android, their web UI's (aside from Chrome) also tend to be clunky, poorly laid out designs with what I call "option bombardment", just look at gmail on the web for reference (and again, Google KNOWS gmail's web UI is terrible).

 

As I said before, it wasn't that Android's UI was terrible, it worked, but it was akin to using Windows 3.x ... it was better than DOS, but it still sucked. ;)

 

And replacing a UI just so it looks different isn't what I'm talking about, either. I don't think changing how a UI looks does anything, it's just slapping a fresh coat of lipstick on a pig (which is what Android was doing from v1.0 to 4.4), as the underlying framework was largely the same. Starting with Android L, however, the framework is changing along with the look, which is an example of GOOD UI replacement...not just change for the sake of change.

Edited by Y2HH

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
QUOTE (raBBit @ Jun 27, 2014 -> 07:30 PM)
I think I accidentally downloaded some malware/spyware or some sort of a virus on my Mac. There is unwated links, ads, all of my sites have ads placed into them. It's a huge pain in the ass. I tried deleting all my recent downloads and resetting my browser and it did nothing. I used "clamxav" and ran a sweep and nothing came up. I am not sure if this is even the right thread for this, but if someone could direct me somewhere to get this cleaned up I would really appreciate it. I am not a tech guy and this is a huge pain in the ass. I have a 2013 Macbook Air if that makes a difference to anyone.

 

I've never really heard of anything like this -- and if ClamXAV couldn't find it, odds are it's not spyware/malware/virus. Sounds more like a trojan horse, which requires the user to be tricked into downloading a program, executing it, and then giving it admin privileges when it requests them. Nothing can prevent the damage this causes.

 

Try installing a different browser to see if maybe it's a extension installed on the browser? If Chrome doesn't do this, but Safari does, it's probably something on Safari.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
QUOTE (Jake @ Jun 27, 2014 -> 06:33 PM)
One of my main beefs with iOS, and it continues to be with iOS 8 it looks like, is the launcher. Launchers on Android are often a way to customize the look of things (which I like to do sometimes), but it is also a way for me to set up specific workflows. I like having a search bar widget, a weather widget, and an agenda widget and just a few frequently used apps. Then on the next screen a few other things - a rotating Feedly headlines widget along with some of my news/sports apps. The rest? Out of sight in the app drawer. Notifications are probably my next highest priority - I think iOS 7 was a big improvement in this regard, but I honestly don't recall the details.

 

Speaking of Apple and notifications, the notifications menu interested in Mavericks is just awesome. I'd be hardcore committed to Windows forever if they would implement that. Until then, I'm considering going MacBook Air for my upcoming computer purchase. Also thinking about Surface Pro 3 (really).

 

I have never been a fan of widgets, not since Microsoft or Apple started using them eons ago on their desktop platforms...I was very happy Apple didn't bother bombarding a OS for smaller screens iOS with widgets. I DO, however, think Microsofts "live tile" approach is a better idea, and a good compromise between full blown widgets and useful icon launchers.

 

The ONLY widget I find useful on Android is the search widget (Google Search), the rest of them are nothing more than glorified information poor, space wasting icons. For example, clock widgets are redundant space wasters, they take up 50% of your home screen when the time is ALREADY clearly displayed along the top bar on every phone. Weather widgets? Useless. At a glance high/low temps do nothing for me...I want to see hourly rain/temp forecasts and radar, which means using the weather widget to launch the weather program anyway.

 

iOS 8 introduces widgets into the notification center, and I'm not sure how well that will work, either...I'd have preferred Apple went the way of Microsofts "live tile" approach with "live icons", versus widgets...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
QUOTE (Y2HH @ Jun 28, 2014 -> 07:31 AM)
Of course, people need to recognize that a lot of this is just opinion, but it's always been my opinion that something was missing from Android, it felt clunky even after it's repeated revamps and "project butters". As said, some of this stems from the over customization OEMs do with Android, but a lot of it comes from the framework Android is built upon, which is why a lot of Google's own applications on iOS were superior to their own Android counterparts. Of course, Google has done a lot of work on UI framework as of late, and it shows ... but I disagree with anyone that thinks their UI's were ever good, it's just an opinion, but I believe they were fair to poor designs, and I think the proof exists in that Google obviously agreed with me, hence their entire rework of the framework Android is based on. And it's not just limited to Android, their web UI's (aside from Chrome) also tend to be clunky, poorly laid out designs with what I call "option bombardment", just look at gmail on the web for reference (and again, Google KNOWS gmail's web UI is terrible).

 

As I said before, it wasn't that Android's UI was terrible, it worked, but it was akin to using Windows 3.x ... it was better than DOS, but it still sucked. ;)

 

And replacing a UI just so it looks different isn't what I'm talking about, either. I don't think changing how a UI looks does anything, it's just slapping a fresh coat of lipstick on a pig (which is what Android was doing from v1.0 to 4.4), as the underlying framework was largely the same. Starting with Android L, however, the framework is changing along with the look, which is an example of GOOD UI replacement...not just change for the sake of change.

 

Butters.jpg

 

QUOTE (Y2HH @ Jun 28, 2014 -> 07:44 AM)
I have never been a fan of widgets, not since Microsoft or Apple started using them eons ago on their desktop platforms...I was very happy Apple didn't bother bombarding a OS for smaller screens iOS with widgets. I DO, however, think Microsofts "live tile" approach is a better idea, and a good compromise between full blown widgets and useful icon launchers.

 

The ONLY widget I find useful on Android is the search widget (Google Search), the rest of them are nothing more than glorified information poor, space wasting icons. For example, clock widgets are redundant space wasters, they take up 50% of your home screen when the time is ALREADY clearly displayed along the top bar on every phone. Weather widgets? Useless. At a glance high/low temps do nothing for me...I want to see hourly rain/temp forecasts and radar, which means using the weather widget to launch the weather program anyway.

 

iOS 8 introduces widgets into the notification center, and I'm not sure how well that will work, either...I'd have preferred Apple went the way of Microsofts "live tile" approach with "live icons", versus widgets...

 

I am a fan of live tiles, too. A genuinely unique and good idea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
QUOTE (raBBit @ Jun 28, 2014 -> 10:35 AM)
Thanks for the response. I deleted all extensions and nothing changed. I am having this problem on Chrone and I am unable to open Safari...

 

Odd...load up activity monitor and look at the running processes -- do you see anything that stands out as "odd"? There will be a lot of processes running, but look for something obvious...

 

A few more things to do:

 

1) Try running disk utility and doing a permissions repair.

2) Try uninstalling Chrome (completely uninstalling it), go download AppCleaner (http://www.freemacsoft.net/appcleaner/), and drag Chrome into AppCleaner (it will erase everything on your drive related to Chrome), then reinstall Chrome clean. Before you do that, make sure you download the Chrome installer (in case you can't launch Safari and download it after you destroy Chrome).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
QUOTE (Y2HH @ Jun 27, 2014 -> 08:20 PM)
Not WAS, IS. And Google knows it, hence their major redesign of something that was just redesigned less than 2 years ago.

 

It was 3 years ago, almost 4 if you take into account that Holo was created for Android 3.0.

 

I feel like 3 years is more than appropriate for a re-design.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
QUOTE (Y2HH @ Jun 28, 2014 -> 07:31 AM)
Of course, people need to recognize that a lot of this is just opinion, but it's always been my opinion that something was missing from Android, it felt clunky even after it's repeated revamps and "project butters". As said, some of this stems from the over customization OEMs do with Android, but a lot of it comes from the framework Android is built upon, which is why a lot of Google's own applications on iOS were superior to their own Android counterparts. Of course, Google has done a lot of work on UI framework as of late, and it shows ... but I disagree with anyone that thinks their UI's were ever good, it's just an opinion, but I believe they were fair to poor designs, and I think the proof exists in that Google obviously agreed with me, hence their entire rework of the framework Android is based on. And it's not just limited to Android, their web UI's (aside from Chrome) also tend to be clunky, poorly laid out designs with what I call "option bombardment", just look at gmail on the web for reference (and again, Google KNOWS gmail's web UI is terrible).

 

As I said before, it wasn't that Android's UI was terrible, it worked, but it was akin to using Windows 3.x ... it was better than DOS, but it still sucked. ;)

 

And replacing a UI just so it looks different isn't what I'm talking about, either. I don't think changing how a UI looks does anything, it's just slapping a fresh coat of lipstick on a pig (which is what Android was doing from v1.0 to 4.4), as the underlying framework was largely the same. Starting with Android L, however, the framework is changing along with the look, which is an example of GOOD UI replacement...not just change for the sake of change.

 

The framework you're speaking of, ART, has been available since Android 4.4, which was released more than half a year ago. And that has almost nothing to do with UI. It has a lot more to do with UX.

 

I think you're just throwing around the word "terrible" out there for no apparent reason. I'm not sure how the Gmail UI is terrible or how Holo UI is terrible. Just because Google thinks they can improve their interface doesn't mean they thought it was terrible.

 

I also think you've never actually used Android if you think Android 1.0 and Android 4.4 are similar performance-wise. Most of what you said pretty much confirms that you haven't had a ton of experience using Android (understandable, since you're an Apple user).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
QUOTE (chw42 @ Jun 28, 2014 -> 09:07 PM)
The framework you're speaking of, ART, has been available since Android 4.4, which was released more than half a year ago. And that has almost nothing to do with UI. It has a lot more to do with UX.

 

I think you're just throwing around the word "terrible" out there for no apparent reason. I'm not sure how the Gmail UI is terrible or how Holo UI is terrible. Just because Google thinks they can improve their interface doesn't mean they thought it was terrible.

 

I also think you've never actually used Android if you think Android 1.0 and Android 4.4 are similar performance-wise. Most of what you said pretty much confirms that you haven't had a ton of experience using Android (understandable, since you're an Apple user).

 

To be more clear, in this conversation when I talk about "framework", I mean the basic design language and parameters in how applications and UI's are built, for example, in Android L, they're calling it "Material Design", so in this case I wasn't talking about ART or Dalvik, which are both runtimes.

 

I *never* said Android 1.x to 4.x was similar *performance* wise, I said Google went through a number of revamps and project butters to make Android "run better", not to mention SOC design is much better these days which alone would make it run better. Specifically, I was talking about the framework itself, which was still largely the same in the way apps were designed, the clunky/boring square shapes, borders, the drab color schemes, etc. I'll reference that before 4.4, ALL of Google's apps on iOS were superior to their own apps on Android, INCLUDING the first release of Google Maps on iOS that made Android's look like complete crap. The whole look and feel of Android, INCLUDING the current 4.4, was and is just "blah"...was it better than 1.x and 2.x? Yes. But it was still using Windows 3.x, which while still better than DOS...it it was still lacking. The good news is, I think Google took this seriously enough to rework it's ENTIRE design philosophy in Android L, so now they can stop slapping brighter lipstick on that same old pig and move in a better direction with a better looking model. ;)

 

Since I'm not yet out of cliches or unrelated references to OS's and how they look, Google spent years trying to make Android 1.x-4.x look like Kate Upton by slapping makeup on some average looking girl...who would never look like Kate Upton no matter how much makeup and airbrushing they used...

Edited by Y2HH

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
QUOTE (Y2HH @ Jun 29, 2014 -> 07:52 AM)
To be more clear, in this conversation when I talk about "framework", I mean the basic design language and parameters in how applications and UI's are built, for example, in Android L, they're calling it "Material Design", so in this case I wasn't talking about ART or Dalvik, which are both runtimes.

 

I *never* said Android 1.x to 4.x was similar *performance* wise, I said Google went through a number of revamps and project butters to make Android "run better", not to mention SOC design is much better these days which alone would make it run better. Specifically, I was talking about the framework itself, which was still largely the same in the way apps were designed, the clunky/boring square shapes, borders, the drab color schemes, etc. I'll reference that before 4.4, ALL of Google's apps on iOS were superior to their own apps on Android, INCLUDING the first release of Google Maps on iOS that made Android's look like complete crap. The whole look and feel of Android, INCLUDING the current 4.4, was and is just "blah"...was it better than 1.x and 2.x? Yes. But it was still using Windows 3.x, which while still better than DOS...it it was still lacking. The good news is, I think Google took this seriously enough to rework it's ENTIRE design philosophy in Android L, so now they can stop slapping brighter lipstick on that same old pig and move in a better direction with a better looking model. ;)

 

Since I'm not yet out of cliches or unrelated references to OS's and how they look, Google spent years trying to make Android 1.x-4.x look like Kate Upton by slapping makeup on some average looking girl...who would never look like Kate Upton no matter how much makeup and airbrushing they used...

 

You do realize that Google apps on iOS also used Holo design right...? This was especially evident before iOS 7. Maps was updated first on iOS because Apple Maps replaced the old Maps app, Google gave it priority. Android got the updated version a few months later and it looked more or less the same.

 

You're literally bashing something that you liked on iOS.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
QUOTE (chw42 @ Jun 29, 2014 -> 03:06 PM)
You do realize that Google apps on iOS also used Holo design right...? This was especially evident before iOS 7. Maps was updated first on iOS because Apple Maps replaced the old Maps app, Google gave it priority. Android got the updated version a few months later and it looked more or less the same.

 

You're literally bashing something that you liked on iOS.

 

This highlights exactly what I've been saying... Google maps on iOS (original release) was better than what was present on Android, but don't take that for me saying I love it...I don't, it's still just ok design. I'd prefer apple maps UI with googles data set if I had a choice. People don't use Google maps on iOS because of its design, as it's often slow, clunky, and busy (yes, even today), they use it for its accuracy and extremely populated data set. Which goes back to my point from the start...even Googles updated "holo" designs aren't great, they're simply better than the absolute crap that preceded it.

 

So, I again say, I welcome the changes coming in android l. I don't really understand why you can't just accept that, as far as I'm concerned -- and in my opinion -- up until now, googles UI design is meh.

Edited by Y2HH

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got the Galaxy S5 yesterday, and had the S2 before. The S2 had the ability to stop auto-sync for each individual app, and I can't find how to do that with the S5. Anyone else know? I found the function to stop all auto-syncs, but that isn't what I want. I want to turn a few specific ones off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
QUOTE (Y2HH @ Jun 29, 2014 -> 07:41 PM)
This highlights exactly what I've been saying... Google maps on iOS (original release) was better than what was present on Android, but don't take that for me saying I love it...I don't, it's still just ok design. I'd prefer apple maps UI with googles data set if I had a choice. People don't use Google maps on iOS because of its design, as it's often slow, clunky, and busy (yes, even today), they use it for its accuracy and extremely populated data set. Which goes back to my point from the start...even Googles updated "holo" designs aren't great, they're simply better than the absolute crap that preceded it.

 

So, I again say, I welcome the changes coming in android l. I don't really understand why you can't just accept that, as far as I'm concerned -- and in my opinion -- up until now, googles UI design is meh.

 

It's fine that you have that opinion, I just believe that it's absolutely wrong.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
QUOTE (chw42 @ Jun 30, 2014 -> 11:21 AM)
It's fine that you have that opinion, I just believe that it's absolutely wrong.

 

You're opinion doesn't matter since you believe Google has had good UI design prior to Android L, so...as the Rock would say, it doesn't matter what you think.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
QUOTE (Y2HH @ Jun 30, 2014 -> 12:07 PM)
You're opinion doesn't matter since you believe Google has had good UI design prior to Android L, so...as the Rock would say, it doesn't matter what you think.

 

Heh, someone's getting personal.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Gotta hand it to Apple here, that's an amazingly durable display (if it's the actual part).

 

I'm not sure how much more expensive a sapphire screen would be compared to Gorilla Glass, but that should be on every smartphone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
QUOTE (chw42 @ Jul 7, 2014 -> 05:54 PM)

 

Gotta hand it to Apple here, that's an amazingly durable display (if it's the actual part).

 

I'm not sure how much more expensive a sapphire screen would be compared to Gorilla Glass, but that should be on every smartphone.

 

I love that guys reviews on phones. I watched a bunch of them when I was deciding on a new phone last October.

 

That screen looks awesome.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
QUOTE (Chilihead90 @ Jul 7, 2014 -> 07:05 PM)
I love that guys reviews on phones. I watched a bunch of them when I was deciding on a new phone last October.

 

That screen looks awesome.

 

MKBHD's videos have great production value. And while he's not as specific as I would like in some of his reviews, they're all pretty good.

 

It's amazing how he's at 1 million+ subscribers. I remember when I first started watching his videos, he had maybe 100K.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
QUOTE (chw42 @ Jul 7, 2014 -> 07:10 PM)
MKBHD's videos have great production value. And while he's not as specific as I would like in some of his reviews, they're all pretty good.

 

It's amazing how he's at 1 million+ subscribers. I remember when I first started watching his videos, he had maybe 100K.

 

His lack of over technical explanations are a reason why he's good. He's very conversational and it's as if your neighbor is talking about his new phone he got.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
QUOTE (Chilihead90 @ Jul 7, 2014 -> 07:05 PM)
I love that guys reviews on phones. I watched a bunch of them when I was deciding on a new phone last October.

 

That screen looks awesome.

I mean its about time. I was beginning to believe they wanted phones to break so you had to buy a new one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What online file storage set-up do people recommend?

 

I'm looking for the simple ability to access documents from home, work, coffee shop, etc. These would be mostly Microsoft Office documents with some larger data sets as well. I don't plan on using it for photos, music, or video. I enjoy Drop Box's ease of use, but I do not really want to have to buy extra storage (my current storage needs are about 5-6 GB). I also could use Google Drive or Microsoft One Drive. I am leaning towards One Drive due to the relatively high free storage size, the fact that I am using Windows 7 and 8.1 on my computers, the apparently good file and folder syncing (as several reviews have pointed out), and the fact that my work might be moving to Office 365.

 

I realize I'm probably way behind on this, so any thoughts or advice would be appreciated. Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×