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Steve9347

Wow, Humber. You fo' realz?

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QUOTE (southsider2k5 @ Jun 1, 2011 -> 07:31 AM)
For the record, 91-93 is not "below average fastball".

For the record, he sits mostly around 90-91 without much movement. You can only get away with that with good location and keeping batters off balance. And for the most part, Humber's done that.

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QUOTE (BearSox @ Jun 1, 2011 -> 01:22 PM)
For the record, he sits mostly around 90-91 without much movement. You can only get away with that with good location and keeping batters off balance. And for the most part, Humber's done that.

 

That isn't below average either.

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QUOTE (southsider2k5 @ Jun 1, 2011 -> 02:39 PM)
That isn't below average either.

I'd say 90 mph with no or little movement is below average in the MLB, but that's just me.

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QUOTE (BearSox @ Jun 1, 2011 -> 03:43 PM)
I'd say 90 mph with no or little movement is below average in the MLB, but that's just me.

How are you quantifying "Little movement"? You're correct on his average velocity, however, I'm not sure how I can quantify movement.

 

For example, I just picked Roy Halladay as a guy who I think has a lot of movement on his standard pitches, and checked the standard fastball movement (not his 2 seamer).

 

For the standard fastball, Halladay's pitch breaks 4.4 inches left and 5.8 inches down. Humber's fastball breaks 6 inches left and 8.8 inches down, so if nothing else, relative to his release point, Humber's fastball actually moves more than Doc's.

 

I'm happy to concede that I'm not reading these numbers right and there's something else to relative release points that I'm not understanding, but please, quantify your little movement part for me.

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QUOTE (Balta1701 @ Jun 1, 2011 -> 02:53 PM)
How are you quantifying "Little movement"? You're correct on his average velocity, however, I'm not sure how I can quantify movement.

 

For example, I just picked Roy Halladay as a guy who I think has a lot of movement on his standard pitches, and checked the standard fastball movement (not his 2 seamer).

 

For the standard fastball, Halladay's pitch breaks 4.4 inches left and 5.8 inches down. Humber's fastball breaks 6 inches left and 8.8 inches down, so if nothing else, relative to his release point, Humber's fastball actually moves more than Doc's.

 

I'm happy to concede that I'm not reading these numbers right and there's something else to relative release points that I'm not understanding, but please, quantify your little movement part for me.

I'm going strictly based off what I have seen of him this season. His fastball moves, all do. But his just doesn't have the life on it that's gonna make it tough for hitters to hit.

 

Maybe below average was too critical, especially with his curve and he has a change up to. I guess average to a tick below would be more fair.

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QUOTE (BearSox @ Jun 1, 2011 -> 03:00 PM)
I'm going strictly based off what I have seen of him this season.

BearSox, the official Scout of Soxtalk.

 

We are screw.

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QUOTE (Balta1701 @ Jun 1, 2011 -> 02:53 PM)
How are you quantifying "Little movement"? You're correct on his average velocity, however, I'm not sure how I can quantify movement.

 

For example, I just picked Roy Halladay as a guy who I think has a lot of movement on his standard pitches, and checked the standard fastball movement (not his 2 seamer).

 

For the standard fastball, Halladay's pitch breaks 4.4 inches left and 5.8 inches down. Humber's fastball breaks 6 inches left and 8.8 inches down, so if nothing else, relative to his release point, Humber's fastball actually moves more than Doc's.

 

I'm happy to concede that I'm not reading these numbers right and there's something else to relative release points that I'm not understanding, but please, quantify your little movement part for me.

 

Pitch f/x slays all eye test arguments. :headbang

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You know what my eye sees...

 

nobody hitting Humber very hard, very often.

 

On another note, I can think of a guy that throws a slow fastball that doesn't move very much. But his is 85. Yeah, that's Buehrle. Mark Buehrle has this biggest s*** repertoire ever and does just so well. Straight, slow fastball. Straight changeup that by conventional wisdom is often too fast compared to his fastball. Cutter moves, but not much. Big loopy curveball. I must assume that the first three must all look exactly the same out of the hand, or else he wouldn't have this type of success. But moreover, the dude puts it exactly where he wants it.

 

Humber throws better stuff (literally every single pitch that he throws is better than Buehrle's equivalent) and, for now, he knows where it's going. I'd say him and AJ are on the same page (or at least the right page) so he's making the most out of pretty decent stuff.

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So is it basically the case that if you dont have 3 yrs service time in, you are always going to have Arb years to go through. Even if you've signed a 1 yr 500K with a new team.

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