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greg775

Parents Stuck With Their Kids

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QUOTE (greg775 @ May 27, 2016 -> 03:21 PM)
I appreciate this post and your heartfelt commentary.

I do have a question. You are right about Millenials wanting to balance work life and home life and they don't want to work 60-70-80 hours a week like we do. My question is ... how do you handle this now? It's going to be a while before Millenials are in charge of all the companies and can make sure their employees have a lot of free time/vacation time. How do you survive in the interim. I hear law offices are making the Millenials work just as much as the older folks are used to. Are Millenials quitting their jobs once they realize the jobs control their lives completely?

This mixing and matching of generations would appear to hurt the Millenials because they will quit or be fired when the old codgers put amzing demands on their time.

 

Your point is well acknowledged. Well, when I am ready to enter the workforce in that capacity I am going to make myself as marketable as possible. I am going to investigate companies that I want to work for (companies with solid values, and yes I know there probably aren't many of them) and relentlessly apply for their jobs. In the meantime, which could potentially be awhile after I graduate, I will retain my excellent retail job to make ends meet. I can't speak for other millenials because my situation is unique. I suppose millenials who absolutely need to have a giant house and all the best toys will need to suck it up and do what it takes to hit the ceiling of their careers. However, I imagine that many millenials can do with less and live a happy life. For me it is not all about being at the top of the food chain and making six figures. If the opportunity cost of achieving such a goal means scarce family time and little leisure/individual time, then I don't think I'd set to achieve such a goal so long as I'm not living in poverty for it.

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QUOTE (South Sider @ May 28, 2016 -> 04:37 AM)
Your point is well acknowledged. Well, when I am ready to enter the workforce in that capacity I am going to make myself as marketable as possible. I am going to investigate companies that I want to work for (companies with solid values, and yes I know there probably aren't many of them) and relentlessly apply for their jobs. In the meantime, which could potentially be awhile after I graduate, I will retain my excellent retail job to make ends meet. I can't speak for other millenials because my situation is unique. I suppose millenials who absolutely need to have a giant house and all the best toys will need to suck it up and do what it takes to hit the ceiling of their careers. However, I imagine that many millenials can do with less and live a happy life. For me it is not all about being at the top of the food chain and making six figures. If the opportunity cost of achieving such a goal means scarce family time and little leisure/individual time, then I don't think I'd set to achieve such a goal so long as I'm not living in poverty for it.

Interesting. There are a lot of expensive houses in suburbia and two car garages that will need to be filled in the future. Maybe parents will just hand those houses down to their millenial kids. Not blasting you, but desire to have all the toys and a white picket fence around a mansion of a house has seemed to attract a lot of people in the Western Suburbs for years. Those mortgages will have to be paid and those SUV's bought. You're gonna have to have a heckuva job to pay all the $$$.

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QUOTE (Quinarvy @ May 27, 2016 -> 04:23 PM)
I worked 30 hours a week on top of 10 hours of grad school. Many people do tbat.

 

And you're over estimating how many people work this mythical 70-80 hour work week happily. For starters, no employer is paying that much overtime

 

True and False. False, people are working those hours. True employers are not paying overtime. They put the employees on salary so they do not have to pay the overtime, yet they know the person will put in those hours to keep their jobs.

 

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QUOTE (Tex @ May 29, 2016 -> 03:38 PM)
True and False. False, people are working those hours. True employers are not paying overtime. They put the employees on salary so they do not have to pay the overtime, yet they know the person will put in those hours to keep their jobs.

Exactly and if millenials don't want to work work work, what happens in the future? The baby boomers work until they are no more? One problem. Nobody's hiring anybody over 45years old.

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QUOTE (Tex @ May 29, 2016 -> 09:38 AM)
True and False. False, people are working those hours. True employers are not paying overtime. They put the employees on salary so they do not have to pay the overtime, yet they know the person will put in those hours to keep their jobs.

 

Well, Obama just turned that on it's head. Should have said I was thinking along the lines after this law got passed.

 

http://www.cnsnews.com/news/article/cnsnew...st-pay-salaried

 

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I just read a story that said Millenials will take less money to be able to work in jeans and less stressful situations. I will applaud Millenials big time if it removes collared shirts and ties from the office. Does anybody really wear a tie anymore? Ties are disgusting.

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QUOTE (greg775 @ May 30, 2016 -> 02:35 PM)
I just read a story that said Millenials will take less money to be able to work in jeans and less stressful situations. I will applaud Millenials big time if it removes collared shirts and ties from the office. Does anybody really wear a tie anymore? Ties are disgusting.

 

My current office has no code. Some wear gym clothes.

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QUOTE (Quinarvy @ May 31, 2016 -> 11:37 AM)
My current office has no code. Some wear gym clothes.

I think that's awesome. My company is too client-facing to get away with that, but if I worked at a place where it was all internal to the company, I don't see why you wouldn't be allowed to wear whatever you want.

 

i.e. My current client (a major clothing retailer) allows the people (whether salaried or hourly) in their distribution centers to wear whatever - i.e. shorts and a tshirt. But at the corporate office(s), their dress code is standard business casual.

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QUOTE (ChiSox_Sonix @ May 31, 2016 -> 12:51 PM)
Looks like that only applies to those making less than his arbitrary threshold, however.

There already was a threshold, but it hasn't been raised in decades. And of course any number is going to be arbitrary.

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QUOTE (dasox24 @ May 31, 2016 -> 03:24 PM)
I think that's awesome. My company is too client-facing to get away with that, but if I worked at a place where it was all internal to the company, I don't see why you wouldn't be allowed to wear whatever you want.

 

i.e. My current client (a major clothing retailer) allows the people (whether salaried or hourly) in their distribution centers to wear whatever - i.e. shorts and a tshirt. But at the corporate office(s), their dress code is standard business casual.

 

Don't get me wrong. Whenever we go out to events that dictate dressing nicely, we do. Otherwise people will go on our livestream in their day-to-day outfits. It also seems to put guests at ease.

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In a more macro take I look at it like this:

 

Manufacturing jobs WAY gone in general. Most agree. Therefore the need for low management, entry levels is gone.

Going to the office jobs WAY down in general with the increase in internet & technological efficiency. Don't need unskilled dudes at desks as much really.

Sales jobs WAY down due to tech improvements.

Less local mom&pop shops due to Walmarts, obamacare. $15/hr will destroy mom&pop for good. Obliterate. He gone.

40hr weeks are becoming more non-existent in lower-end, entry-level positions. More people/less hours is the skyrocketing business model in no-skill, entry-level arenas. And of course it is. Why offer unaffordable benefits to the replaceable.

 

Higher costs of living coupled with lower wages equals stay at home.

 

More competition to join the trades now since all the above jobs are gone or becoming less fruitful-available.

 

Add on top of that a skyrocketing population.

 

Maybe I'm off on some of this but the fact that nobody has anything interesting or skillful to put on the resumes I look at paints a bleak picture to me. Resumes are full of people trying to twist common things into skills.

 

Being skilled gets you a good job. Having an unskilled degree, might as well flip burgers.

 

 

 

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QUOTE (Jerksticks @ Jun 3, 2016 -> 01:37 AM)
Add on top of that a skyrocketing population.

 

Population growth is at all-time lows.

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QUOTE (Jerksticks @ Jun 2, 2016 -> 07:37 PM)
In a more macro take I look at it like this:

 

Manufacturing jobs WAY gone in general. Most agree. Therefore the need for low management, entry levels is gone.

Going to the office jobs WAY down in general with the increase in internet & technological efficiency. Don't need unskilled dudes at desks as much really.

Sales jobs WAY down due to tech improvements.

Less local mom&pop shops due to Walmarts, obamacare. $15/hr will destroy mom&pop for good. Obliterate. He gone.

40hr weeks are becoming more non-existent in lower-end, entry-level positions. More people/less hours is the skyrocketing business model in no-skill, entry-level arenas. And of course it is. Why offer unaffordable benefits to the replaceable.

 

Higher costs of living coupled with lower wages equals stay at home.

 

More competition to join the trades now since all the above jobs are gone or becoming less fruitful-available.

 

Add on top of that a skyrocketing population.

 

Maybe I'm off on some of this but the fact that nobody has anything interesting or skillful to put on the resumes I look at paints a bleak picture to me. Resumes are full of people trying to twist common things into skills.

 

Being skilled gets you a good job. Having an unskilled degree, might as well flip burgers.

This is why I feel it is necessary to go back and get a degree in healthcare or something. The boomers will always need care and there will always be insurance flowing. Physical therapy, occupational therapy and nursing are all hot fields. I wish I could say the same about a business person at a hospital serving as the administrator and having that same job security, though.

 

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QUOTE (SpankyEaton @ Jun 2, 2016 -> 08:35 PM)
This is why I feel it is necessary to go back and get a degree in healthcare or something. The boomers will always need care and there will always be insurance flowing. Physical therapy, occupational therapy and nursing are all hot fields. I wish I could say the same about a business person at a hospital serving as the administrator and having that same job security, though.

 

Nicely said. I agree that winding the boomers down is going to be full of available money since they have most of it.

 

I agree about the businessman too. A career being an unskilled businessman is looking bleaker. Any company can just hire younger people without mouths to feed for much less. Scary proposition to sell yourself as a good manager in business and make a career out of it. How hard is it to tell a younger person to "watch ted & margaret, and keep track of these files, and answer these phones, manage these accounts. If you get sick of it I'll jist hire that dude over there since all you are is a warm body that follows orders". I know that was vague and impersonal but it's just tough being unskilled with so many people now. Management is no longer a skill. It's just next man up.

 

There's gonna be a ton of money made for whoever creates dense communities for the baby-boomers who got passed over to live in. Like all the guys who had cush "management" positions ripped out from under them in the last decade and now they are going to retire broke working part time at home depot and whatnot.

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QUOTE (NorthSideSox72 @ May 26, 2016 -> 09:07 AM)
I moved back home, briefly, when I was 25.

 

Ditto. And then again at 28. It's not a joke out here and I'm glad both my parents (although divorced) have that kind of compassion.

 

There's a guy I know who is 33 and still lived with his parents. I think his culture is a bit different too.

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QUOTE (Jerksticks @ Jun 2, 2016 -> 11:34 PM)
Nicely said. I agree that winding the boomers down is going to be full of available money since they have most of it.

 

I agree about the businessman too. A career being an unskilled businessman is looking bleaker. Any company can just hire younger people without mouths to feed for much less. Scary proposition to sell yourself as a good manager in business and make a career out of it. How hard is it to tell a younger person to "watch ted & margaret, and keep track of these files, and answer these phones, manage these accounts. If you get sick of it I'll jist hire that dude over there since all you are is a warm body that follows orders". I know that was vague and impersonal but it's just tough being unskilled with so many people now. Management is no longer a skill. It's just next man up.

 

There's gonna be a ton of money made for whoever creates dense communities for the baby-boomers who got passed over to live in. Like all the guys who had cush "management" positions ripped out from under them in the last decade and now they are going to retire broke working part time at home depot and whatnot.

 

The industry I started in, electronic distribution was founded by individuals who were excellent salespeople. They took pride in selling items at a fair prices and paying their employees well would could deliver. Then as a few companies were taken over by large corporations they knocked the margins ways down and hired twice the staff at one third the cost each and sent them out with cheaper prices. The better salespeople who commended a premium based on their customer service skills, long term relationships with customers, etc. were squeezed out by cheaper prices. Now with everyone following that approach you still have salespeople busting their butts, but now they are doing it for half the pay of a generation before. Plus, because they can, a college degree is required for most of the companies. Hell, I remember working with a guy who was hired because the sales manager met him while he was painting the offices. They had a mess up, the painter worked his ass to make us happy and was so customer orientated he was almost hired on the spot. He went on to have a great career for a while.

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QUOTE (SoxAce @ Jun 3, 2016 -> 05:27 AM)
Ditto. And then again at 28. It's not a joke out here and I'm glad both my parents (although divorced) have that kind of compassion.

 

There's a guy I know who is 33 and still lived with his parents. I think his culture is a bit different too.

Were they disappointed you moved back in?

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QUOTE (greg775 @ Jun 4, 2016 -> 02:18 PM)
Were they disappointed you moved back in?

 

Kelso-BURN.jpg

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One of my friends has a 25 year old daughter living at home with no prospects of moving out cause she can't find a good job.

I do feel the pain of Millenials in a lot of ways. They are inheriting a work force that a.) does not want to pay them medical benefits. b.) that does not want to ever give them performance bonuses or heaven forbid, raises in pay according to merit. c.) that requires overtime with no overtime pay, basically threatening them with termination if they don't play along and do the work for no extra pay and finally d.) they are the generation that in college was expected to do unpaid internships which should be illegal. If somebody does work, they deserve pay.

 

So I ask ... can we blame Millenials for moving back in with mom and dad? Are there any hope for millenials that don't become doctors in terms of them ever making a fair, decent buck? Best wishes to all new grads BTW and best of luck in finding suitable employment!

 

Also I would like to ask those Soxtalkers who have a say in management of their companies ... do you have unpaid internships and what is your justification for having kids come in and work for NO PAY? Unpaid internships anger me beyond no end. Pay The Worker, don't hide behind the fact it's an internship.

Edited by greg775

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QUOTE (greg775 @ Jun 9, 2016 -> 05:57 PM)
One of my friends has a 25 year old daughter living at home with no prospects of moving out cause she can't find a good job.

I do feel the pain of Millenials in a lot of ways. They are inheriting a work force that a.) does not want to pay them medical benefits. b.) that does not want to ever give them performance bonuses or heaven forbid, raises in pay according to merit. c.) that requires overtime with no overtime pay, basically threatening them with termination if they don't play along and do the work for no extra pay and finally d.) they are the generation that in college was expected to do unpaid internships which should be illegal. If somebody does work, they deserve pay.

 

So I ask ... can we blame Millenials for moving back in with mom and dad? Are there any hope for millenials that don't become doctors in terms of them ever making a fair, decent buck? Best wishes to all new grads BTW and best of luck in finding suitable employment!

 

Also I would like to ask those Soxtalkers who have a say in management of their companies ... do you have unpaid internships and what is your justification for having kids come in and work for NO PAY? Unpaid internships anger me beyond no end. Pay The Worker, don't hide behind the fact it's an internship.

 

Especially because some places have interns do the same work.

 

An old place I was at tried to keep people as students as long as possible, then minimum wage interns with sporadic hours.

 

Meanwhile the place I'm at now decided to go from $15/hr, 30 hrs a week to temp. salaried full timers. We don't get benefits as temps, but the pay raise is huge.

 

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QUOTE (greg775 @ Jun 9, 2016 -> 04:57 PM)
One of my friends has a 25 year old daughter living at home with no prospects of moving out cause she can't find a good job.

I do feel the pain of Millenials in a lot of ways. They are inheriting a work force that a.) does not want to pay them medical benefits. b.) that does not want to ever give them performance bonuses or heaven forbid, raises in pay according to merit. c.) that requires overtime with no overtime pay, basically threatening them with termination if they don't play along and do the work for no extra pay and finally d.) they are the generation that in college was expected to do unpaid internships which should be illegal. If somebody does work, they deserve pay.

 

So I ask ... can we blame Millenials for moving back in with mom and dad? Are there any hope for millenials that don't become doctors in terms of them ever making a fair, decent buck? Best wishes to all new grads BTW and best of luck in finding suitable employment!

 

Also I would like to ask those Soxtalkers who have a say in management of their companies ... do you have unpaid internships and what is your justification for having kids come in and work for NO PAY? Unpaid internships anger me beyond no end. Pay The Worker, don't hide behind the fact it's an internship.

The only people in my store who have worked for no pay are my sons (usually working off a debt to me) and myself. And FYI, unpaid internships were all the rage back in the 80's as well. I turned down a few of them because I needed to get paid to cover school costs.

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QUOTE (pettie4sox @ May 27, 2016 -> 10:36 AM)
Yeah if you don't get a scholarship, paying for two years of CC isn't terrible but the kids need to bust their asses so they can get scholarships. I had a scholarship and still had to take out loans. My sister got a scholarship and still had to take out loans. College is just too damn expensive these days. It's a big business now.

Yes, you can thank most states for decreasing their funding. Private schools have always been expensive.

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QUOTE (greg775 @ Jun 9, 2016 -> 04:57 PM)
One of my friends has a 25 year old daughter living at home with no prospects of moving out cause she can't find a good job.

I do feel the pain of Millenials in a lot of ways. They are inheriting a work force that a.) does not want to pay them medical benefits. b.) that does not want to ever give them performance bonuses or heaven forbid, raises in pay according to merit. c.) that requires overtime with no overtime pay, basically threatening them with termination if they don't play along and do the work for no extra pay and finally d.) they are the generation that in college was expected to do unpaid internships which should be illegal. If somebody does work, they deserve pay.

 

So I ask ... can we blame Millenials for moving back in with mom and dad? Are there any hope for millenials that don't become doctors in terms of them ever making a fair, decent buck? Best wishes to all new grads BTW and best of luck in finding suitable employment!

 

Also I would like to ask those Soxtalkers who have a say in management of their companies ... do you have unpaid internships and what is your justification for having kids come in and work for NO PAY? Unpaid internships anger me beyond no end. Pay The Worker, don't hide behind the fact it's an internship.

This has always been the practice in allied health professions. The clinical instructor mentoring the student doesn't get extra pay and the student doesn't either. The theory is that the time spend mentoring is time away from patiet care so the student is costing the company money already.

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QUOTE (ptatc @ Jun 10, 2016 -> 12:42 PM)
This has always been the practice in allied health professions. The clinical instructor mentoring the student doesn't get extra pay and the student doesn't either. The theory is that the time spend mentoring is time away from patiet care so the student is costing the company money already.

It's still wrong. If you work you should get reimbursed. Unpaid internships are garbage.

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