Help - Search - Members - Calendar
Full Version: Buying a New Desktop computer
Soxtalk.com > Special Interest Forums > SLaM
Pages: 1, 2
Jenksismybitch
So, I used to be on top of this stuff back in the day, but now not so much. It's been about 6 years since my last desktop purchase and my old Gateway is becoming slower and slower and more of a pain in the ass. So what's a decent computer these days? It will be used primarily for web surfing, photo viewing (not editing), the occasional Netflix watch and the occasional game, though I'm not sure i'm interested in anything other than Diablo III and that seems to have a moderate set of requirements but nothing too drastic.

I can get an i5 processor with 8gbs of ram (expandable to 16) and a 1tb hard drive for about $530 bucks at Best Buy. It has an internal graphics card, so I might have to drop a hundred or two on a new graphics card, but that seems to be a good price. Everything jumps in price 2-300 bucks when you look at the i7 stuff. Anyone have one? Is it worth the jump? Are i5's pretty fast (keeping in mind i'm stuck with a dual core 1.8ghz proc with like 3gb or ram now)?

Thoughts are much appreciated.
CrimsonWeltall
QUOTE (Jenksismyb**** @ Apr 24, 2012 -> 10:01 PM) *
So, I used to be on top of this stuff back in the day, but now not so much. It's been about 6 years since my last desktop purchase and my old Gateway is becoming slower and slower and more of a pain in the ass. So what's a decent computer these days? It will be used primarily for web surfing, photo viewing (not editing), the occasional Netflix watch and the occasional game, though I'm not sure i'm interested in anything other than Diablo III and that seems to have a moderate set of requirements but nothing too drastic.

I can get an i5 processor with 8gbs of ram (expandable to 16) and a 1tb hard drive for about $530 bucks at Best Buy. It has an internal graphics card, so I might have to drop a hundred or two on a new graphics card, but that seems to be a good price. Everything jumps in price 2-300 bucks when you look at the i7 stuff. Anyone have one? Is it worth the jump? Are i5's pretty fast (keeping in mind i'm stuck with a dual core 1.8ghz proc with like 3gb or ram now)?

Thoughts are much appreciated.


There's no way you need an i7.

Diablo 3 has low requirements.

You can look at guides like the stuff at Tom's Hardware. http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/build-...clock,3159.html
Soxbadger
Jenks,

When I was thinking desktop, I was considering the X51 as desktop computer that can run games.

http://www.alienware.com/Landings/desktops.aspx

Its small and I figured I could pick it up and move it to different rooms like my PS3.

Its a little bit more expensive, so it depends on the longevity.
CrimsonWeltall
QUOTE (Soxbadger @ Apr 24, 2012 -> 11:20 PM) *
Jenks,

When I was thinking desktop, I was considering the X51 as desktop computer that can run games.

http://www.alienware.com/Landings/desktops.aspx

Its small and I figured I could pick it up and move it to different rooms like my PS3.

Its a little bit more expensive, so it depends on the longevity.


Unless something major has changed (which I doubt with them being bought out by Dell), Alienware has always been extremely overpriced for their performance.

Build your own.
Soxbadger
I dont build computers and I like Dell's warranty when I break them.

Not for everyone but was definitely worth it for me.
IlliniKrush
You aren't old, until desktops completely go away, I will probably always own one.
Chilihead90
I have always had great success with Dells, and if you know anyone with a current .edu address, you can get a pretty substantial student discount through Dell. My laptop was $1300 before my student discount. I think I paid $900.
knightni
You can buy a cheap desktop on eBay (that's where I got mine). There are a lot of really good refurbished ones out there. If you're concerned about spyware etc, just take it to a local computer guy for a diagnostic after you get it.

chw42
QUOTE (Jenksismyb**** @ Apr 24, 2012 -> 05:01 PM) *
So, I used to be on top of this stuff back in the day, but now not so much. It's been about 6 years since my last desktop purchase and my old Gateway is becoming slower and slower and more of a pain in the ass. So what's a decent computer these days? It will be used primarily for web surfing, photo viewing (not editing), the occasional Netflix watch and the occasional game, though I'm not sure i'm interested in anything other than Diablo III and that seems to have a moderate set of requirements but nothing too drastic.

I can get an i5 processor with 8gbs of ram (expandable to 16) and a 1tb hard drive for about $530 bucks at Best Buy. It has an internal graphics card, so I might have to drop a hundred or two on a new graphics card, but that seems to be a good price. Everything jumps in price 2-300 bucks when you look at the i7 stuff. Anyone have one? Is it worth the jump? Are i5's pretty fast (keeping in mind i'm stuck with a dual core 1.8ghz proc with like 3gb or ram now)?

Thoughts are much appreciated.


If you want value, get AMD. If you want the performance and don't really care for the price, get Intel.

I'm guessing you're not going to build this computer since you don't plan on doing anything exhaustive on it, so you might as well just buy the computer you're talking about. Just keep in mind that the stuff big manufacturers put into your PC might not be of the highest quality. From what I've experienced, they usually tend to cheap out on vital things like your power supply.

I've been building computers since I was in high school, so I'm biased. I've never bought a pre-built computer myself.
gatnom
QUOTE (chw42 @ Apr 25, 2012 -> 02:56 AM) *
If you want value, get AMD. If you want the performance and don't really care for the price, get Intel.

I'm guessing you're not going to build this computer since you don't plan on doing anything exhaustive on it, so you might as well just buy the computer you're talking about. Just keep in mind that the stuff big manufacturers put into your PC might not be of the highest quality. From what I've experienced, they usually tend to cheap out on vital things like your power supply.

I've been building computers since I was in high school, so I'm biased. I've never bought a pre-built computer myself.


Agree with this. Building a computer is a lot easier than people perceive it to be, and you get much better value as well.

StrangeSox
QUOTE (gatnom @ Apr 25, 2012 -> 03:05 AM) *
Agree with this. Building a computer is a lot easier than people perceive it to be, and you get much better value as well.

It really isn't much more complex than building some ikea furniture.

I just built a new desktop last month for about $500. A little less memory and storage than the machine in junks post but I didn't cheap out on the mobo or p/s.
HickoryHuskers
QUOTE (Jenksismyb**** @ Apr 24, 2012 -> 06:01 PM) *
So, I used to be on top of this stuff back in the day, but now not so much. It's been about 6 years since my last desktop purchase and my old Gateway is becoming slower and slower and more of a pain in the ass. So what's a decent computer these days? It will be used primarily for web surfing, photo viewing (not editing), the occasional Netflix watch and the occasional game, though I'm not sure i'm interested in anything other than Diablo III and that seems to have a moderate set of requirements but nothing too drastic.

I can get an i5 processor with 8gbs of ram (expandable to 16) and a 1tb hard drive for about $530 bucks at Best Buy. It has an internal graphics card, so I might have to drop a hundred or two on a new graphics card, but that seems to be a good price. Everything jumps in price 2-300 bucks when you look at the i7 stuff. Anyone have one? Is it worth the jump? Are i5's pretty fast (keeping in mind i'm stuck with a dual core 1.8ghz proc with like 3gb or ram now)?

Thoughts are much appreciated.


I have an i5 laptop and use mine pretty much the same way you are describing, so you should be fine.
southsider2k5
QUOTE (Soxbadger @ Apr 24, 2012 -> 05:43 PM) *
I dont build computers and I like Dell's warranty when I break them.

Not for everyone but was definitely worth it for me.



QUOTE (JoeCoolMan24 @ Apr 25, 2012 -> 12:23 AM) *
I have always had great success with Dells, and if you know anyone with a current .edu address, you can get a pretty substantial student discount through Dell. My laptop was $1300 before my student discount. I think I paid $900.


I have had Dells for over a decade now. Two to be exact. Never had any problems that weren't self-induced. Pay attention the their ads in the Sunday section of the Sunday Tribune and they run some really good specials.
Jenksismybitch
QUOTE (StrangeSox @ Apr 25, 2012 -> 06:18 AM) *
It really isn't much more complex than building some ikea furniture.

I just built a new desktop last month for about $500. A little less memory and storage than the machine in junks post but I didn't cheap out on the mobo or p/s.


I checked that tomhardware link. If I bought all of the components of their $600 system, does it come with all the parts I need? For example, tiny little screws I need to mount the mother board to the case, wires to connect everything etc. My computer hardware installation is limited to installing some new ram and a video/sound card.....nothing crazy.

Also, are all cases equal? Looks like they recommend a $30 case, but why couldn't I just take apart the one I have and use that?
StrangeSox
QUOTE (Jenksismyb**** @ Apr 25, 2012 -> 09:07 AM) *
I checked that tomhardware link. If I bought all of the components of their $600 system, does it come with all the parts I need? For example, tiny little screws I need to mount the mother board to the case, wires to connect everything etc. My computer hardware installation is limited to installing some new ram and a video/sound card.....nothing crazy.

Also, are all cases equal? Looks like they recommend a $30 case, but why couldn't I just take apart the one I have and use that?


Your p/s will come with all the power cords. You'll need a couple of SATA cables to hook up your DVD and HD drives. If you buy the retail version and not the OEM version it may come with the SATA cables. I think my mobo came with at least one and I pillaged the other from my old computer.

Some cases have some additional features like front-panel USB and audio ports. But unless you're getting into some crazy high-end stuff where you need to optimize cooling and air flow, just about any case will do. This is the case I got and I'm pretty happy with it. It came with all of the mounting hardware I needed as well as several fans pre-mounted. The blue light is kinda dumb but you could always unplug that if you wanted. Mine's inside of a desk so it doesn't matter. Since the ATX/microATX form factor has been around forever, I'd imagine that you can reuse your old case. Newer cases that aren't the absolute cheapest you can find have some nicer features that can make assembly and wire routing cleaner and easier.

Powersupply

CPU<-this is the unlocked one, so you can easily overclock it. Overclocking is apparently very simple these days and a lot of mobo's even have utilities to do it easily and safely. If you're not interested in overclocking (the stock i5 2500 is pretty fast in its own right), then you can get the version without the "k" at the end for a few bucks cheaper. I didn't realize this when I ordered mine so I have the locked version.

MoBo Since I'm just using the integrated graphics for now, I needed to make sure I got a MoBo that was compatible with it. The Z68 chipset allows you to use integrated graphics and overclock. The only downside so far is that since it's a microATX, it doesn't have as many slots and features and I haven't been able to hook up my front-panel USB 3.0 connectors.

Like you, I used to follow this stuff more closely years ago, but then my computer became outdated to the point I couldn't upgrade and I stopped paying attention. My desktop started barely functioning a few months ago so I finally dug in and read up a little, mostly on Tom's Hardware.
StrangeSox
One thing to keep in mind is that you'll need to either use a free OS like something Linux or acquire a copy of Windows, so factor that into your budget. I had a purchased copy of Windows 7 that I installed on my old netbook that I broke so I used that.
CrimsonWeltall
QUOTE (Jenksismyb**** @ Apr 25, 2012 -> 03:07 PM) *
I checked that tomhardware link. If I bought all of the components of their $600 system, does it come with all the parts I need? For example, tiny little screws I need to mount the mother board to the case, wires to connect everything etc. My computer hardware installation is limited to installing some new ram and a video/sound card.....nothing crazy.

Also, are all cases equal? Looks like they recommend a $30 case, but why couldn't I just take apart the one I have and use that?


The motherboard you buy would come with the screws. I've never had to buy any parts (screws/connectors/etc) when building a computer.

As far as the case goes, What is your existing case? If it's some standard ATX case, you'll be fine. However, companies like Dell often use proprietary case-mobo combinations that won't work with anything else.
CrimsonWeltall
QUOTE (StrangeSox @ Apr 25, 2012 -> 03:25 PM) *
Your p/s will come with all the power cords. You'll need a couple of SATA cables to hook up your DVD and HD drives. If you buy the retail version and not the OEM version it may come with the SATA cables. I think my mobo came with at least one and I pillaged the other from my old computer.


I think most mobos usually come with 2-4 now. The one from my earlier Tom's Hardware link comes with 2.
StrangeSox
Oh and I'm not sure how well it actually correlates to performance, but the "Windows Experience" rates my new desktop as 5.6 out of 7.9 overall, with the graphics being the lowest rating. I haven't actually tried to run any games, though. For comparison, my work PC, which has a $500 workstation graphics card, gets a 6.7 graphics score.
Jenksismybitch
QUOTE (StrangeSox @ Apr 25, 2012 -> 09:27 AM) *
One thing to keep in mind is that you'll need to either use a free OS like something Linux or acquire a copy of Windows, so factor that into your budget. I had a purchased copy of Windows 7 that I installed on my old netbook that I broke so I used that.


Ugh, forgot about that. Yeah I might just buy a cheap i5 computer and buy a decent video card for 150 bucks and call it a day
StrangeSox
QUOTE (Jenksismyb**** @ Apr 25, 2012 -> 09:44 AM) *
Ugh, forgot about that. Yeah I might just buy a cheap i5 computer and buy a decent video card for 150 bucks and call it a day


You can get a copy for $100
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx...N82E16832116986

Going with the BB computer is definitely easier in the short term and probably a little bit cheaper. Just keep in mind that you may be replacing the power supply down the road.
Jenksismybitch
What about power supply? My buddy recommended I get this graphics card: http://www.amazon.com/Sapphire-Radeon-6850...pd_rhf_dp_p_t_1

Looks like it requires a 500w power source. Is that a mandatory thing or just a recommended thing? I can't tell what the computer i'm looking at has

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/Gateway+-+Desk...p;skuId=3155928

edit: looks like it's got a 300W supply.
CrimsonWeltall
QUOTE (Jenksismyb**** @ Apr 25, 2012 -> 03:07 PM) *
What about power supply? My buddy recommended I get this graphics card: http://www.amazon.com/Sapphire-Radeon-6850...pd_rhf_dp_p_t_1

Looks like it requires a 500w power source. Is that a mandatory thing or just a recommended thing? I can't tell what the computer i'm looking at has

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/Gateway+-+Desk...p;skuId=3155928

edit: looks like it's got a 300W supply.


Google "power supply calculator" and enter your parts. It will give you a recommended minimum for the PSU.

I strongly doubt 300W is going to be sufficient. Also, good brand 300W PSU is WAY better than a no-name 300W PSU, which is what the BestBuy unit probably has.
StrangeSox
You can run into weird problems and even potentially damage your components by under-powering them. Newegg has a handy calculator for recommended power supply sizing.

Since I knew I was sticking with integrated graphics for now, I haven't really read up on graphics cards.
RockRaines
I would BYO as well if you have those simple requirements. A Dell is just going to have those rebranded parts marked up, and sometimes they are lesser version of ones you can buy for cheaper (harddrives especially).
StrangeSox
I'm sure some of the other people who actually work in the field can offer stronger recommendations (y2hh?), but I run free anti-virus from Avast! on my machines and haven't had any issues.
CrimsonWeltall
QUOTE (StrangeSox @ Apr 25, 2012 -> 03:17 PM) *
I'm sure some of the other people who actually work in the field can offer stronger recommendations (y2hh?), but I run free anti-virus from Avast! on my machines and haven't had any issues.


Same. No problems with Avast here.
RockRaines
QUOTE (CrimsonWeltall @ Apr 25, 2012 -> 10:18 AM) *
Same. No problems with Avast here.

Yeah, heard good things. Also if you are just gaming and watching netflix could could firewall the s*** out of that thing and never open emails and be pretty ok.
StrangeSox
That computer has a slower HDD @ 5400RPM as well. 7200 RPM disks are widely available.
Y2HH
There are advantages and disadvantages of building your own versus buying pre-built machines from a place like Dell.

The advantages:
More choices, from graphics to sound to wireless, whatever the component in question, you have infinitely more -- and often better -- choice.
WAY cheaper. And when I say way, I mean WAY...probably half the total cost with better components.
Customizable to your exact requirements, be it graphics processing or just email, etc.

The disadvantages:
Size, these machines will never be as sleek/small as a all-in-one like a iMac as they have separated monitors, etc.
Having to build it which requires some experience/knowledge, understanding what components to buy and why, etc.
Purchasing the operating system (unless you use some flavor of Linux), this adds about 100$ to the cost and requires you to install it (for you Windows people), and then get the necessary/updated drivers for the components you installed. While default drivers often work fine, you SHOULD install the latest from the manufacturer.
Warranty. When you build your own, every component has it's own warranty, which you will have to box up ship back if it breaks, which requires experience to know what component is broken and why.

---

While pre-built machines cost more, they're easier to have fixed, etc. I only recommend building your own to people with some computer/operating system experience...otherwise the increased cost is justifiable for those with less experience. That said, it can be a very fun project and a GREAT learning experience for those looking to get into IT, believe it or not, building your own computer and installing the OS from scratch is a GREAT first step to gain some experience.

One of the most important things is a good power supply, that can supply enough power to drive a good modern graphics card. You don't have to go overboard, but don't "go cheap" on the power supply, either.

Also, keep in mind that a *GOOD* monitor costs a LOT. Whether you buy pre-built or not, when it comes to LCD's you get what you pay for. Note that I didn't say a crappy knock off monitor, I said a good monitor...for photo/video/gamers like myself, the monitor is just as important as the graphics card.
StrangeSox
QUOTE (Y2HH @ Apr 25, 2012 -> 10:41 AM) *
Also, keep in mind that a *GOOD* monitor costs a LOT. Whether you buy pre-built or not, when it comes to LCD's you get what you pay for. Note that I didn't say a crappy knock off monitor, I said a good monitor...for photo/video/gamers like myself, the monitor is just as important as the graphics card.


I have two of these at work:

http://reviews.cnet.com/lcd-monitors/hp-lp...7-33230410.html

Y2HH
QUOTE (StrangeSox @ Apr 25, 2012 -> 10:17 AM) *
I'm sure some of the other people who actually work in the field can offer stronger recommendations (y2hh?), but I run free anti-virus from Avast! on my machines and haven't had any issues.


IMO, the best current "free" and VERY good Anti-Virus program is Microsoft Security Essentials...it's a relatively new release from Microsoft, and it's completely *free*, not to mention ad-free, all encompassing protection -- it does virus, malware, etc. -- with a VERY small footprint (doesn't take up a lot of resources).

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows...rity-essentials

For Windows users, it's as good as any paid AV software on the market right now.

Edit:

I've no experience with Avast, and in order to give an opinion I'd have to load it up and test it, see how much memory/processor it uses, how many processes it spawns, etc...and how well it ties into the OS. I'd also like to know what information it's reporting back to Avast...as I doubt it's 'free' out of the goodness of their hearts.

I do have experience with Symantec and McAfee, too...and of those, I prefer Symantec...but right now I'd stick with Microsoft Security Essentials. Microsoft has built a very secure OS over the years and if anyone knows how to further protect it from viruses/malware, it's the mother ship itself.

For Apple/OSX users, I'd recommend using the free ClamXav, which can be downloaded direct or from the app store. The App store version does not have "active scanning", as it does not load an agent in the background and scan files as you use them. This is the version I use/recommend (app store version)...however, if you want active scanning, you can download a more robust version directly from the makers of ClamXav. At the very least, I'd recommend downloading it (again, it's free), updating the definitions and performing a full scan. Despite the recent media hoopla of malware outbreaks on OSX, I wouldn't be very worried about it...at least not yet. That said, nothing wrong with taking a pre-emptive interest and protecting yourself a bit.
RockRaines
QUOTE (StrangeSox @ Apr 25, 2012 -> 10:44 AM) *

Nice. I have 2 sammy's framing my 24 inch imac. Its almost too much, almost.
Jenksismybitch
Hmm, sounds like i'm going to have to research the BYO option. Seems like there are 100 variations of the same components though, and I don't know what's good and what's bad.

And I've already got a nice 23 inch LED monitor. Just need to add a decent computer to use it!
Jenksismybitch
Also, what's the best place to buy the parts? Amazon? Newegg? Other?
Y2HH
QUOTE (Jenksismyb**** @ Apr 25, 2012 -> 11:16 AM) *
Hmm, sounds like i'm going to have to research the BYO option. Seems like there are 100 variations of the same components though, and I don't know what's good and what's bad.

And I've already got a nice 23 inch LED monitor. Just need to add a decent computer to use it!


That's the hardest part about building your own if you don't have a lot of modern hardware experience...it's hard to know what's good/bad. While it will take a bit of time, research each component and see what the general consensus is.

As for monitors, they're very much of the "until you have X, Y is fine" mindset. I currently run 2560x1440 resolution and could NOT go back to something smaller on a desktop now, but until I started using 2560x1440, 1920x1200 was fine. Needless to say, it's no longer fine for me. :/
Y2HH
QUOTE (Jenksismyb**** @ Apr 25, 2012 -> 11:20 AM) *
Also, what's the best place to buy the parts? Amazon? Newegg? Other?


Newegg is pretty good for this sort of thing in my experience.
RockRaines
QUOTE (Jenksismyb**** @ Apr 25, 2012 -> 11:20 AM) *
Also, what's the best place to buy the parts? Amazon? Newegg? Other?

I like going to microcenter, picking out the pieces and then double checking on newegg or amazon.
CrimsonWeltall
QUOTE (Jenksismyb**** @ Apr 25, 2012 -> 05:20 PM) *
Also, what's the best place to buy the parts? Amazon? Newegg? Other?


I like Newegg. Shipping is usually free and always fast and they have good customer service (I ordered a case from them and UPS banged it up and refused to take responsibility. Newegg paid for a new side panel for it).
RockRaines
This thread just made me go buy 8 more gigs of RAM for my imac, thanks for reminding me!
Y2HH
QUOTE (RockRaines @ Apr 25, 2012 -> 11:29 AM) *
This thread just made me go buy 8 more gigs of RAM for my imac, thanks for reminding me!


I have 16 gigs in mine...memory is SO cheap, I see no reason why people have less than 12 anymore. 8 gigs is around 45$, and even less with rebates...even cheaper if you go generic on the memory, but I don't recommend that.
RockRaines
QUOTE (Y2HH @ Apr 25, 2012 -> 12:00 PM) *
I have 16 gigs in mine...memory is SO cheap, I see no reason why people have less than 12 anymore. 8 gigs is around 45$, and even less with rebates...even cheaper if you go generic on the memory, but I don't recommend that.

Nah, I am a crucial guy.

Its so funny that Apple charges almsot a grand for an 8 gig upgrade, or it could be 16, whatever its ridiculous. Even the most basic computer user can put in memory.
Swingandalongonetoleft
QUOTE (Jenksismyb**** @ Apr 24, 2012 -> 04:01 PM) *
Diablo III and that seems to have a moderate set of requirements


I wasn't thrilled to find out one of those requirements is maintaining an internet connection at all times, even if you just want to play single player. I've never met an internet connection that is 100% reliable. Additionally, if there are problems on Blizzard's end of things, no one plays.
Jenksismybitch
QUOTE (Swingandalongonetoleft @ Apr 25, 2012 -> 12:43 PM) *
I wasn't thrilled to find out one of those requirements is maintaining an internet connection at all times, even if you just want to play single player. I've never met an internet connection that is 100% reliable. Additionally, if there are problems on Blizzard's end of things, no one plays.


Eh, I played WoW for a number of years, so i'm just going in thinking it's the same thing. I'll expect the occasional, but rare, outage.

So for those that know - is there a big performance jump between AMD and Intel? I should just be looking for (1) fit with the motherboard and (2) speed right?
CrimsonWeltall
QUOTE (Jenksismyb**** @ Apr 25, 2012 -> 07:16 PM) *
Eh, I played WoW for a number of years, so i'm just going in thinking it's the same thing. I'll expect the occasional, but rare, outage.

So for those that know - is there a big performance jump between AMD and Intel? I should just be looking for (1) fit with the motherboard and (2) speed right?


Performance comparisons
http://www.anandtech.com/bench/CPU/2

Pick a CPU, then pick a matching mobo after that.
Jenksismybitch
Man, this has taken over my day looking into all my options here.

Anyone overclocked their stuff? Is that easy to do, i.e. can you just let a computer program handle it?
CrimsonWeltall
QUOTE (Jenksismyb**** @ Apr 25, 2012 -> 06:39 PM) *
Man, this has taken over my day looking into all my options here.

Anyone overclocked their stuff? Is that easy to do, i.e. can you just let a computer program handle it?


Overclocking has become a much easier process, yes.
Y2HH
QUOTE (Jenksismyb**** @ Apr 25, 2012 -> 01:39 PM) *
Man, this has taken over my day looking into all my options here.

Anyone overclocked their stuff? Is that easy to do, i.e. can you just let a computer program handle it?


It's usually just a bios setting these days, or at the most, a simple jumper on the motherboard that's easy to switch around. That said, for most things, you won't have to worry about OC'ing, it's mostly not necessary these days unless you are seriously trying to push the limits for things like rendering or playing games at maximum settings trying to eek out every last drop of performance. Your system should be fine without overclocking for most regular applications...you don't seem like the type that cares about making sure Diablo 3 runs at 71fps instead of 69fps.
StrangeSox
With the new GUI BIOS screens overclocking is super easy.

Based on a few articles I've come across at sites like tomshardware, it's not hard to get substantially more performance out of an i5-2500k, pushing it up into i7 territory and not increasing the thermal load much at all.
Jenksismybitch
The only reason I ask is that I can spend an extra 20 bucks and get the unlocked i5 chip. If it's something I might eventually do (i.e., easy enough to do) I'll just do that. My ATI Radeon graphics card from back in the day had that feature and it rarely worked properly.
This is a "lo-fi" version of our main content. To view the full version with more information, formatting and images, please click here.
Invision Power Board © 2001-2014 Invision Power Services, Inc.