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*Official* Work Out Thread

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When members in the locker room are too lazy to throw their dirty towels in the bin and just leave em on the floor for others to walk around.

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QUOTE (Harry Chappas @ Feb 7, 2011 -> 11:50 AM)
People that work-out on cardio machines and talk on the phone. I wear an ipod turned up all the way so I can not hear them but the sight of it irks me, I do not know why.

 

Also, people that work on a cardio machine for 10 minutes or less.

 

I sweat like a pig, I wipe my machines off but if I do cardio for more than 90 minutes I think I begin stink a little. I do not care, it is gym that is going to happen. Sorry. I am hygenic so I do not think I offend anyone, at least he person I workout with does not say anything. The people that smell like smoke though do getto me as to the perfume folks.

 

The women that wear excessive amounts of jewelry also get to me.

It's understood that you're going to smell bad in the gym. It's the people that don't even try to not burn your nostrils that I'm talking about. Right now I'm thinking about one guy in particular. I used to try to get to the gym as late as I could in the morning to avoid this guy.

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Not a new one, but one that I was reminded of this morning at the gym. The old woman who thinks she is still attractive wearing very little clothing when in fact, she is hideous -- or 15 years past any semblance of decency.

Edited by maggsmaggs

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The fact that every month or so, my legs will just decide mid-workout "Ok, we're done".

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This may need its own thread, but it related to the gym and dieting.

 

I'm at about 200 pounds which isn't that bad considering I'm about 6'2'' and weighed in around 185 when I went away my freshman year. I work out about five times a week, but with the winter being the way that it is I have been running for only 20-30 minutes after I lift and am taking it easy in the weight room. I'm a novice when it comes to the weight room and I honestly need someone to just come up with a plan for me. St. Ambrose has a crappy weight room but it will have to do till May when I graduate.

 

All that I am trying to do is tighten up the ass a bit, tone up the legs, maintain the current abs that I have/strengthen them a little and work on tone in my biceps...perhaps strengthen my back and triceps. What I'm doing in the weight room is as follows:

 

Lat pulldown (10, 8, 6 reps - 105, 120, 130 pounds)

Bench press (10, 8, 6 reps - 120, 130, 140 pounds)

Pushups (20 before exhausted)

Some odd weight machine that appears to strengthen deltoids (ranging 120 - 140 pounds at 10, 8 6 reps)

3 sets of planks (30 seconds each - I don't know what will reduce the shaking when I do them but I can complete them.)

There's the seated row that I could do and also a tricep rope that I could do to strengthen that section.

Cardio activity for 30 minutes following weights - random hill generator on the bike, average level on the oliptical (weak ass machine or I'm doing it wrong) or running on a treadmill for 30 minutes (the treadmills are facing against the wall without TVs, so I have to read and use music to keep myself motivated).

 

I don't know who could show me how to do the dead lift or make sure I'm honest with squats (as most of my friends quit when it comes to lifting commitments) but I want to do them correctly and still be able to do cardio - is it best to just alternate days so that I can do so?

 

I'm also trying to eat better but I've already done my research on that and am going to eradicate some of the s*** that I eat from my pantry along with kicking out some crap from my diet. If there's any further information that you need, please let me know. I want to do what is best for my body at this age.

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QUOTE (MuckFinnesota @ Feb 8, 2011 -> 11:44 PM)
This may need its own thread, but it related to the gym and dieting.

 

I'm at about 200 pounds which isn't that bad considering I'm about 6'2'' and weighed in around 185 when I went away my freshman year. I work out about five times a week, but with the winter being the way that it is I have been running for only 20-30 minutes after I lift and am taking it easy in the weight room. I'm a novice when it comes to the weight room and I honestly need someone to just come up with a plan for me. St. Ambrose has a crappy weight room but it will have to do till May when I graduate.

 

All that I am trying to do is tighten up the ass a bit, tone up the legs, maintain the current abs that I have/strengthen them a little and work on tone in my biceps...perhaps strengthen my back and triceps. What I'm doing in the weight room is as follows:

 

Lat pulldown (10, 8, 6 reps - 105, 120, 130 pounds)

Bench press (10, 8, 6 reps - 120, 130, 140 pounds)

Pushups (20 before exhausted)

Some odd weight machine that appears to strengthen deltoids (ranging 120 - 140 pounds at 10, 8 6 reps)

3 sets of planks (30 seconds each - I don't know what will reduce the shaking when I do them but I can complete them.)

There's the seated row that I could do and also a tricep rope that I could do to strengthen that section.

Cardio activity for 30 minutes following weights - random hill generator on the bike, average level on the oliptical (weak ass machine or I'm doing it wrong) or running on a treadmill for 30 minutes (the treadmills are facing against the wall without TVs, so I have to read and use music to keep myself motivated).

 

I don't know who could show me how to do the dead lift or make sure I'm honest with squats (as most of my friends quit when it comes to lifting commitments) but I want to do them correctly and still be able to do cardio - is it best to just alternate days so that I can do so?

 

I'm also trying to eat better but I've already done my research on that and am going to eradicate some of the s*** that I eat from my pantry along with kicking out some crap from my diet. If there's any further information that you need, please let me know. I want to do what is best for my body at this age.

 

My opinion with regards to lifting is that you shouldn't concentrate on certain areas but instead do whatever you can to work out your entire body. There can be certain restrictions, mainly past injuries - the military press is going to be hard if you have bad shoulders, most leg activities will be hard with bad ankles or knees, and the standard squat should be avoided if you have a bad back - but I think you should work out your entire body. Part of this is due to me doing that right now while I am trying to just get all around stronger, because I've never really worked out before, but part of it is due to health too. If you overwork your quads while not getting your hamstring enough, you will end up injuring your hamstrings more often in the future due to your quad simply being much stronger than your hamstring. I would assume the same is true for biceps and triceps too, but don't quote me on that.

 

The workout I am currently doing is actually one that was apparently used by the Arkansas football team. It's only a 4 day workout - we have it split up so that days 1 and 2 of the workout are on Thursday and Friday with 3 and 4 being on Monday and Tuesday with Wednesday being a bit of a free day. Days 1 and 3 work out legs, triceps, and biceps, but mostly focus on legs. Days 2 and 4 are pretty much entirely just the upper torso. On our free day, we work the areas that we don't isolate specifically with these workouts, as well as other areas we feel will help us the most. It goes something like this

 

Day 1 - Squats, Front Squat, Leg Curls, Lunges, Dumbbell Squat and Presses, Towel Triceps, Preacher Curl (and usually abs)

Day 2 - Bench, Pause Bench, Dumbbell Shrugs, Seated Military Press, Lat Pull Downs, Seated Rows, Pull-Up Burnout..one other too that I can't recall.

Day 3 - Cleans, Overhead Squats, Roman Deadlift, Leg Curls, Dumbbell curls, Towel Triceps..one other too (and abs)

Day 4 - Incline Bench, Close Grip Bench, Dumbbell Shoulder Flies, Bent Over Rows, Dumbbell Military Press, Bar Shrugs, Reverse Grip Lat Pull Downs, Dumbbell Bench

Day 5 (free day) - Calves, Groin, Hip Flexor, Forearms, Pull-Up Burnout, Abs, Back Extensions

 

And then I do some type of cardio every other day.

 

I've been on this workout for 3 weeks now, and I have seen my bench press go from 110 to 150 (I will plateau soon enough), I've seen my dumbbells increase anywhere from 5-10 pounds and my bar (and other machine) workouts anywhere from 15-30 pounds, and I have already added quite a bit of muscle definition.

 

I've also been hitting it really hard because I want to get bigger, but you can do variations of these exercises at lighter weights if all you are looking to do is maintain while adding definition. There are also some of these - notably the core exercises of these, which are the bench, squats, cleans, as well as the deadlift - that having a spotter, whether to help you lift or to simply make sure you are doing it right.

 

There are several sites that have workouts set up that people do, so I would suggest doing some independent research too to see if you can find something that suits your desires a bit better as well.

 

Hope this helps!

Edited by witesoxfan

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QUOTE (witesoxfan @ Feb 9, 2011 -> 02:29 AM)
My opinion with regards to lifting is that you shouldn't concentrate on certain areas but instead do whatever you can to work out your entire body. There can be certain restrictions, mainly past injuries - the military press is going to be hard if you have bad shoulders, most leg activities will be hard with bad ankles or knees, and the standard squat should be avoided if you have a bad back - but I think you should work out your entire body. Part of this is due to me doing that right now while I am trying to just get all around stronger, because I've never really worked out before, but part of it is due to health too. If you overwork your quads while not getting your hamstring enough, you will end up injuring your hamstrings more often in the future due to your quad simply being much stronger than your hamstring. I would assume the same is true for biceps and triceps too, but don't quote me on that.

 

The workout I am currently doing is actually one that was apparently used by the Arkansas football team. It's only a 4 day workout - we have it split up so that days 1 and 2 of the workout are on Thursday and Friday with 3 and 4 being on Monday and Tuesday with Wednesday being a bit of a free day. Days 1 and 3 work out legs, triceps, and biceps, but mostly focus on legs. Days 2 and 4 are pretty much entirely just the upper torso. On our free day, we work the areas that we don't isolate specifically with these workouts, as well as other areas we feel will help us the most. It goes something like this

 

Day 1 - Squats, Front Squat, Leg Curls, Lunges, Dumbbell Squat and Presses, Towel Triceps, Preacher Curl (and usually abs)

Day 2 - Bench, Pause Bench, Dumbbell Shrugs, Seated Military Press, Lat Pull Downs, Seated Rows, Pull-Up Burnout..one other too that I can't recall.

Day 3 - Cleans, Overhead Squats, Roman Deadlift, Leg Curls, Dumbbell curls, Towel Triceps..one other too (and abs)

Day 4 - Incline Bench, Close Grip Bench, Dumbbell Shoulder Flies, Bent Over Rows, Dumbbell Military Press, Bar Shrugs, Reverse Grip Lat Pull Downs, Dumbbell Bench

Day 5 (free day) - Calves, Groin, Hip Flexor, Forearms, Pull-Up Burnout, Abs, Back Extensions

 

And then I do some type of cardio every other day.

 

I've been on this workout for 3 weeks now, and I have seen my bench press go from 110 to 150 (I will plateau soon enough), I've seen my dumbbells increase anywhere from 5-10 pounds and my bar (and other machine) workouts anywhere from 15-30 pounds, and I have already added quite a bit of muscle definition.

 

I've also been hitting it really hard because I want to get bigger, but you can do variations of these exercises at lighter weights if all you are looking to do is maintain while adding definition. There are also some of these - notably the core exercises of these, which are the bench, squats, cleans, as well as the deadlift - that having a spotter, whether to help you lift or to simply make sure you are doing it right.

 

There are several sites that have workouts set up that people do, so I would suggest doing some independent research too to see if you can find something that suits your desires a bit better as well.

 

Hope this helps!

Well, keep in mind that most people believe that the only way for muscles to repair themselves and grow is through rest. So if you're working your entire body on a daily basis you may be doing more harm than good. It's usually very productive to work certain muscles one day, and then give them at least one or two days to recover and repair themselves.

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QUOTE (BigSqwert @ Feb 9, 2011 -> 07:13 AM)
Major thread jacking in progress!!

What happened to the exercise thread? I want to get my workout back on...

muscleMan.jpg

 

Edited by Controlled Chaos

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There's always a guy with his music way too loud that you can hear from like 4 machines over. Also, people who use cell phones in the gym especially while on machines or in the locker room

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QUOTE (AssHatSoxFan @ Feb 9, 2011 -> 09:57 AM)
There's always a guy with his music way too loud that you can hear from like 4 machines over. Also, people who use cell phones in the gym especially while on machines or in the locker room

 

How about guys who use typewriters on the treadmill? So annoying.

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I really don't want to offend anyone, but I have to post this.

 

Last night, an Indian man got on the machine next to me and I knew I was toast. Is there something in their religion that says deodorant is bad? I had to switch machines as my nostrils were burning. This isn't the first time, it seems like 9/10 of Indian males* who work out at my gym are unaware that such a product exists, so this is a serious question.

 

It was beyond awful. I wanted to punch this guy. He at least wound up with a whole section of treadmills to himself.

 

I think I'll invent a set of cardio equipment that has smell detectors and refuses to operate with someone who smells that filthy.

 

*I have multiple Indian co-workers and friends and had an Indian roommate in college and this never seems to be an issue. Of course, they aren't jogging at said time. I am curious why this is the case in a larger percentage, and not trying to incite an argument or seem racist.

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About half my floor my freshmen year was Indian, including my roommate. Basically what they told me was that Indians who grew up in America use deodorant, those who immigrated don't.

 

It's just not used in India, it's not part of their social customs there.

 

You would be surprised by how many roommate conflicts surrounded bad smells from foreign students, whether it be different foods (mostly Korean students) or body odor (Indian students), or not doing laundry (lazy ass white kids who didnt know how to do it because their mom always did it). I was an RA for a year and a half, this was by far the most common problem.

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People who get on machines next to you who smell like they just smoked a cigarette the size of Sears Tower, yes I still call it that.

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QUOTE (iamshack @ Feb 9, 2011 -> 06:56 AM)
Well, keep in mind that most people believe that the only way for muscles to repair themselves and grow is through rest. So if you're working your entire body on a daily basis you may be doing more harm than good. It's usually very productive to work certain muscles one day, and then give them at least one or two days to recover and repair themselves.

Some people believe that.

 

I prefer functional training as I know you do as well. Things like plyo, yoga, core exercises uses a ton of muscle groups right after you used them the day before. However, they arent used in the same way. I fully disagree with his strength "routine" above as you will blast certain muscles, but alot of the complementary muscles wont get any work and while his primary group gets used to the routine, he isnt doing the rest of his body any favors.

 

I havent done a bench press in over 5 years. I've used dumbbells for a chest press, but I've never done a set number of reps and then doing them over again. One day you should do a regular set, then the next do a 2-2-2 set meaning 2 seconds up, 2 second hold and 2 seconds down. If you want to do it again the next day do a 4-1-1 or some variant. I also fully believe in doing an exercise then switching to something else before the second set. I also prefer body weight exercises when you can utilize then and fully engage core exercises into your routine like squats, lunges, planks, stability balls etc.

 

Currently I am also doing a heavy circuit routine twice a week for conditioning. The routine I am currently doing is called the 1000:

 

2:30 on, 1:00 off

Gold standard is 100 reps of each exercise

 

1. Push ups

2. Suspended pulls (lats)

3. Squats

4. bicep curls

5. Crunches

6. Chair dips

7. Alternating Lunges

8. Bicycles twists, both ways is one rep

9. Tricep pulldown

10. Swimmers with bands

Edited by RockRaines

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I'm sure it's been mentioned but I hate it so much I'll add it again, people who drench on the perfume or cologne right before working out.

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I have a question. If I am on an elliptical machine, trying to lose weight, and the target heart rate progress bar has categories marked: warm up - fat burn - cardio - max. Do I need to stay in that "fat burn" category? It feels like I'm not even working hard there. I hardly break a sweat. When I'm in the cardio/max category, then I feel like I'm working and burning some real calories. Basically, I think it would take me like 45-60 minutes to burn the same amount of calories I do in 30 minutes if I ignore that "fat burn" zone and just go at it. The question is, is that hurting my weight loss? It seems silly to me that a less intense workout is burning more fat.

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QUOTE (Controlled Chaos @ Feb 16, 2011 -> 08:44 AM)
I have a question. If I am on an elliptical machine, trying to lose weight, and the target heart rate progress bar has categories marked: warm up - fat burn - cardio - max. Do I need to stay in that "fat burn" category? It feels like I'm not even working hard there. I hardly break a sweat. When I'm in the cardio/max category, then I feel like I'm working and burning some real calories. Basically, I think it would take me like 45-60 minutes to burn the same amount of calories I do in 30 minutes if I ignore that "fat burn" zone and just go at it. The question is, is that hurting my weight loss? It seems silly to me that a less intense workout is burning more fat.

Burning calories = weight loss. However you burn more calories is best.

 

As someone who's lost 20 lbs since January 10th, it's all about burning more calories and consuming less calories. Strict weight loss is one of the easiest things you can do... it's math really.

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QUOTE (Steve9347 @ Feb 16, 2011 -> 08:54 AM)
Burning calories = weight loss. However you burn more calories is best.

 

As someone who's lost 20 lbs since January 10th, it's all about burning more calories and consuming less calories. Strict weight loss is one of the easiest things you can do... it's math really.

This is not exactly accurate.

 

Yes, the higher the heart rate, the more calories burned usually. However, your body calls on certain types of energy based upon what you are asking of it. Once you exceed your target heart rate, you start burning muscle, not fat, which is why you will see more weight loss there, since muscle weighs more than fat.

 

You don't want to burn off muscle though, you want to burn off fat. As you get into better shape, your target heart rate will increase though, because your body will not be so overwhelmed by what you are asking of it, and you will be able to workout harder and burn off unwanted fat, rather than muscle.

 

This is the entire purpose of heart rate monitors.

 

Edit: Additionally, there is some thought that resistance training may burn off more calories than cardio training because of the metabolic processes which your body undergoes after the workout. Science is still not necessarily proving this, however, there is a body of anecdotal evidence which is.

Edited by iamshack

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This is something I found online about this "fat-burning" zone. It makes sense to me.

 

 

Let's do the math. Suppose on Monday, you use the elliptical trainer machine for 60 minutes. You stay within that target heart rate that correlates to the fat burning zone. You burn a total of, let's say, 200 calories. I choose 200 here arbitrarily, just for mathematical purposes. Everyone's metabolism is different, and calorie readouts on machines are based on an average-height, 150 pound male. You may be a 5-2, 170 pound female. So keep in mind the mathematical concept here, rather than how many calories your particular body might burn up in 60 minutes.

 

So, you burn 200 calories in 60 minutes in the fat burning zone. Now, about 50 percent of those calories will be fat. 50 percent of 200 is 100. Remember that: You've burned 100 calories of fat.

 

Now, let's say on Wednesday, you get on the same machine, but train in the cardio zone. You pedal faster at a higher pedal resistance. You drip sweat. You hear yourself breathing hard. You huff and puff. After 60 minutes, you've burned 300 calories.

 

In cardio zone training, about 40 percent of the calories burned will be fat. Note: 40 percent is a smaller number than 50 percent. HOWEVER...what's 40 percent of the 300 calories that were burned? It's 120! Your total fat-calories burned were 120! This is 20 percent MORE fat burned, than what you did in your fat burning session on Monday!

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QUOTE (Controlled Chaos @ Feb 16, 2011 -> 11:20 AM)
This is something I found online about this "fat-burning" zone. It makes sense to me.

 

 

Let's do the math. Suppose on Monday, you use the elliptical trainer machine for 60 minutes. You stay within that target heart rate that correlates to the fat burning zone. You burn a total of, let's say, 200 calories. I choose 200 here arbitrarily, just for mathematical purposes. Everyone's metabolism is different, and calorie readouts on machines are based on an average-height, 150 pound male. You may be a 5-2, 170 pound female. So keep in mind the mathematical concept here, rather than how many calories your particular body might burn up in 60 minutes.

 

So, you burn 200 calories in 60 minutes in the fat burning zone. Now, about 50 percent of those calories will be fat. 50 percent of 200 is 100. Remember that: You've burned 100 calories of fat.

 

Now, let's say on Wednesday, you get on the same machine, but train in the cardio zone. You pedal faster at a higher pedal resistance. You drip sweat. You hear yourself breathing hard. You huff and puff. After 60 minutes, you've burned 300 calories.

 

In cardio zone training, about 40 percent of the calories burned will be fat. Note: 40 percent is a smaller number than 50 percent. HOWEVER...what's 40 percent of the 300 calories that were burned? It's 120! Your total fat-calories burned were 120! This is 20 percent MORE fat burned, than what you did in your fat burning session on Monday!

Yes, as I said, you will always burn more calories if you work harder. But the question is, why would you want to burn muscle under any circumstances, unless you were a wrestler or a fighter and needed to make weight or something?

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The calorie counter on an eliptical is an estimate and shouldnt be taken as reality. Furthermore your body is going to start getting used to that exercise since it only uses a certain muscle group and your progress will taper off. I would use half your workout on that and half on some circuit training incorporating some weights or body weight exercises. That will be much more effective that just the eliptical for an hour to lose weight.

 

I would be more than happy to contribute some exercises for a good 30-45 min circuit to burn calories and fat.

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QUOTE (iamshack @ Feb 16, 2011 -> 10:27 AM)
Yes, as I said, you will always burn more calories if you work harder. But the question is, why would you want to burn muscle under any circumstances, unless you were a wrestler or a fighter and needed to make weight or something?

I certainly don't want to burn muscle. I basically have a decent build under the 12 pack I developed. I just want to lose the gut. When I'm in that

"fat burn" mode, it's like I'm not even working hard...hardly even sweat. It's almost like trying to walk super slow....it's awkward.

 

Rock I could use some new exercises. I like the elliptical because it uses both my arms and legs. I can see burned calories and it's way more than I got on the treadmill. Also, it is a nice fit time wise. The weight loss program on there is like 35 minutes which is just about the time I have for it on my lunch break. I can do some different stuff at home, like crunches or what not.

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I was shooting around today and was the only one on the court. It's a full length court with 2 baskets on the sidelines on each side so a total of 6 baskets. I was at one of the mail baskets on the end and another dude starts shooting around and has to shoot at the hopp right next to me instead of going to the other end.

Gosh, people.

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QUOTE (RockRaines @ Feb 16, 2011 -> 11:12 AM)
The calorie counter on an eliptical is an estimate and shouldnt be taken as reality. Furthermore your body is going to start getting used to that exercise since it only uses a certain muscle group and your progress will taper off. I would use half your workout on that and half on some circuit training incorporating some weights or body weight exercises. That will be much more effective that just the eliptical for an hour to lose weight.

 

I would be more than happy to contribute some exercises for a good 30-45 min circuit to burn calories and fat.

I'm interested in some other circuits to possibly run. I've had such a ridiculous work out for the last 4 or so months and I'm just getting tired of it. I'm ready to try something new as I continue to get in better shape performance wise but I can't seem to lose the last bit of fat around the stomach that is keeping the abs more hidden than I want.

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