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Which Vanguard Fund would you feel most confident parking a significant amount of money in for the next 15-20 years, and why?

 

Some of the ones I’m currently looking at (yes, another list!)

vpmcx

visvx

vmvix

vmvax

vpccx

vtsix

vtiax (super popular with FIRE crowd, so maybe tack the opposite direction, haha)

vghcx (health care seems as logical a place as any, right?)

vtwax

vwinx

vigax

vimax

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2 hours ago, caulfield12 said:

Which Vanguard Fund would you feel most confident parking a significant amount of money in for the next 15-20 years, and why?

 

Some of the ones I’m currently looking at (yes, another list!)

vpmcx

visvx

vmvix

vmvax

vpccx

vtsix 

vtiax (super popular with FIRE crowd, so maybe tack the opposite direction, haha)

vghcx (health care seems as logical a place as any, right?)

vtwax

vwinx

vigax

vimax

I parked a substantial amount (to me anyway) in VBIAX.  I'm not particularly risk tolerant, and it has the proper asset mix to diversify at my (and my wife's) age with one fund. I also have a bit of money in VTI which I am funding from dividends on the VBIAX fund.

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whatever one is either the total market index or the target date retirement one, which is where the bulk of our retirement savings are. they're dirt-cheap and perform well. you pay a pretty small premium with vanguard for the target date management.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, StrangeSox said:

whatever one is either the total market index or the target date retirement one, which is where the bulk of our retirement savings are. they're dirt-cheap and perform well. you pay a pretty small premium with vanguard for the target date management.

VTSMX?  
 

Vtthx (2030), vthrx (2035), vforx (2040) three of the investment target date one with four star ratings and lower/ed risk...

Edited by caulfield12

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, caulfield12 said:

VTSMX?  
 

Vtthx (2030), vthrx (2035), vforx (2040) three of the investment target date one with four star ratings and lower/ed risk...

The 3 I have are:

 

VFIAX - SP 500

VTSAX - Total Market

VTIVX- Retirement 2045

(Edit)

I also have a much smaller amount in DFCEX, which is emerging markets, kind of a swerve against US stuff.

Edited by Soxbadger

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Posted (edited)

 

1 hour ago, caulfield12 said:

VTSMX?  
 

Vtthx (2030), vthrx (2035), vforx (2040) three of the investment target date one with four star ratings and lower/ed risk...

Honestly I'd have to look it up. It's all been set to the same auto-invest for several years now. Once every other month or so I'll check Fidelity's full view retirement planner thing to see Number Go Up

 

edit: the fun thing with those retirement planners are how sensitive they are to initial conditions if you're still a couple of decades out from retirement. based on fidelity's three choices, "significantly below average, below average, average" market returns from today through the end of the plan, we could be anywhere from ~3k/month short in retirement to having ~$9k/month extra. that's, uh, kinda a broad range.

Edited by StrangeSox

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22 minutes ago, StrangeSox said:

 

Honestly I'd have to look it up. It's all been set to the same auto-invest for several years now. Once every other month or so I'll check Fidelity's full view retirement planner thing to see Number Go Up

 

edit: the fun thing with those retirement planners are how sensitive they are to initial conditions if you're still a couple of decades out from retirement. based on fidelity's three choices, "significantly below average, below average, average" market returns from today through the end of the plan, we could be anywhere from ~3k/month short in retirement to having ~$9k/month extra. that's, uh, kinda a broad range.

That’s because they are throwing that traditional 60/40 stocks and bond mix ratio out because of the expected or projected fall in the average rate of return for portfolios the next 10-15 years down in the 3-7% ROI range...basically trying to scare everyone into being more aggressive with bond and CD rates at historical lows, 1-2.5%, which doesn’t even keep pace with taxes and inflation.

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